CLEPA |

epresenting the automotive supply and road transport sectors, CLEPA and IRU have addressed a letter to Members of the European Parliament calling for their support in preserving essential technology options under the new CO2 standards proposal.

in CLEPA, 14-09-2023


The signatories raise that the performance of the future EU road transport sector will very much depend on the technology options allowed by the CO2 standards regulation, as well as the enabling conditions required to successfully decarbonise the sector. They defend that a technology-open approach that allows for the coexistence of various vehicle propulsion systems is critical for the efficient operation of the single market, including for emergency responses to all types of crises.

The letter proposes 5 key recommendations for the CO2 regulation standards, to ensure technology diversity and guarantee an efficient decarbonisation of the freight transport sector:

  1. Leave adequate space for carbon-neutral fuels in heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) as a long-term solution for sustainable road transport alongside electrification and hydrogen
  2. Implement essential enabling conditions to achieve ambitious CO2 targets and ensure timely assessment of the legislation’s effectiveness
  3. Exempt high-capacity vehicles from the targets
  4. Include new vehicle groups to the CO2 emission reduction targets for heavy-duty vehicles
  5. Support regional passenger transport by reshuffling bus and coach targets

 

In the letter, CLEPA and IRU also raise that, for a well-functioning and stable EU mobility and logistics sector, the EU should allow transport companies to decide which technology is the most suitable for the various types of operations to achieve the common goal of carbon neutrality.

 

READ MORE

 

CLEPA | European automotive suppliers call on EU institutions to prioritise the adoption of the Critical Raw Materials Act and expedite trilogue negotiations

  • Electric vehicles contain over 200 kilograms of minerals versus around 40 kilograms in a conventional car
  • Current investments in raw material extraction and processing are insufficient to meet growing demand
  • The proposed regulation should accelerate investments within the EU and in strategic partner countries while promoting circularity without imposing excessive requirements

in CLEPA, 12-09-2023


The EU’s automotive supply sector heavily relies on secure access to raw materials to manufacture a wide range of innovative components crucial for advancing climate-neutral mobility, including batteries, electric motors, and lightweight parts. EU automotive suppliers urge the European Commission, Parliament and Council to prioritise the adoption of the EU Critical Raw Materials Act and to ensure trilogue negotiations start as quickly as possible.

While CLEPA acknowledges and appreciates the work done by Members of the European Parliament and Member states to bring forward amendments to the initial proposal, there are areas for improvement.

The European Commission’s proposal for a Critical Raw Materials Act indeed demonstrates the right ambitions by introducing various tools to strengthen the security of supply and resilience of supply chains. However, the initial proposal places excessive emphasis on supply chain surveillance, reporting requirements and monitoring. The regulation should include additional instruments to achieve the objective of ensuring a secure, resilient and diversified supply of raw materials. These should include support for Research & Innovation in the areas of circularity and material substitution, and the conclusion of raw material partnerships with third countries.

CLEPA has identified proposed amendments to enhance the Critical Raw Materials Act in three key aspects:

  • Improve the feasibility of achieving a secure, resilient and diversified supply of raw materials
  • Enhance focus toward strategic investments in supply chains, rather than overemphasizing supply chain surveillance and reporting requirements
  • Promote circularity by increasing material recovery rates and fostering R&I for circularity, while avoiding duplicate circularity requirements

Enhance feasibility of objectives

The Critical Raw Materials Act introduces several valuable tools for industry, including one-stop-shops to streamline regulatory requirements for expanding processing or recycling facilities, as well as setting time limits for permit approval, reducing uncertainty and fast-tracking investments. The Act also facilitates off-take agreements, coordinates and potentially supports financing for strategic raw material projects, addressing financial challenges. Proposed schemes for joint procurement can mitigate cost pressures stemming from volatile raw materials prices. To ensure successful implementation, dedicated administrative resources are essential, with a clearly defined advisory role for industry.

Sharpen focus on strategic investment

The initial proposal places excessive reliance on collective insights into the size and location of strategic stocks across a broad range of (processed) raw materials, which may not align with the needs of individual member states, industries or companies. Instead, the Act should establish a framework that reduces investment risks within the raw materials industry and fosters collaboration across the supply chain. CLEPA welcomes the proposed amendments by the European Parliament to reduce administrative burdens and supports setting clear target for strategic investment partnerships with third countries.

Foster circularity

Circularity must be a fundamental pillar of the strategy to secure the supply of raw material inputs. The proposed End –of-Life Vehicle (ELV) Regulation should be the sole legislation to introduce product-specific circularity requirements for the automotive industry, avoiding redundancy and potential regulatory conflicts. Specifically, the provision for permanent magnets in the ELV Directive (art 12 and Annex VI) deviates from the provisions in the CRMA (art. 27). ELV art. 12 rightly only introduces labeling requirements for permanent magnets that contain Neodymium-Iron-Boron or Samarium-Cobalt (no negative labelling required). Furthermore, the ELV Directive would better protect IP by no longer requiring disclosure of the chemical composition of the magnet. The Critical Raw Materials Act should play a crucial role in supporting the build-up of recycling capacities and fostering a higher recovery rate. The framework should incentivise both the recycling of post-consumer and manufacturing waste. We welcome amendments by the European Parliament to incentivise investment and public funding for R&D in the areas of circularity, design for circularity and material substitution.

 

 

 

 

CLEPA | Members of the European Parliament, Ministers of the 27 EU Member States,   Last year, the European Commission proposed a new Euro 7 pollutant emissions standard for new vehicle types, after years of collecting evidence and data. The European Union needs a timely and well-targeted Euro 7 legislation for cars, vans, trucks and buses to improve the health and wellbeing of its citizens and urban population in particular. Cities cannot be left alone to improve air quality with the limited resources available to them. Euro 7 will make it easier for national and local administrations to deliver on ambient air quality commitments currently being upgraded by EU legislation. While the shift to electromobility is underway, 100 million new vehicles with an internal combustion engine are expected to be sold in the EU in the next decade and will remain on European roads for years to come. Electrification and continued improvement of conventional engines are complementary approaches and should work hand in hand to achieve significant pollution reductions.  Europe needs more ambitious standards and must maintain its global leadership alongside the US and China, which are also adopting more ambitious pollutant regulations. European vehicle manufacturers will need to invest in these other regions in adopting advanced technologies anyway to remain competitive in the global market. New Euro 7 rules need to be adopted within the current legislative period, to ensure that citizens living in cities can continue to benefit as soon as possible from improving air quality facilitated by reduced vehicle pollution. Emission control systems meeting the Commission proposal requirements are already mature and available, as shown by data collected during robust road testing by various technology providers. The timely availability of mature affordable emission control systems meeting the requirements of the Commission proposal has been demonstrated by data collected during robust road testing by various technology providers. To facilitate, implementing and delegated acts should be swiftly adopted after the legislation, with the most important parameters already developed in parallel in the coming months. This early development of the regulatory detail is critical to a successful implementation, providing industry with confidence to invest, and enabling the path to cleaner road transport and improved public health. Further, Euro 7 emission testing procedures need enhancement compared to Euro 6/VI, in combination with the ambitious limit values and lifetime requirements proposed by the Commission, to reflect driving conditions and the actual environmental impact of different vehicle types in the real world. The Commission’s proposed new testing rules will, with certain improvements to ensure representativeness of on-road testing, strike a good balance between what is necessary and what is feasible. They will ensure that emissions from trucks especially will be controlled under true real-world conditions.   As the necessary technologies are already known, the most accurate cost analysis of Euro 7 demonstrates that the price to pay for industry and consumers is moderate. Euro 7 vehicles will remain affordable, while according to the Commission’s own calculations, every euro invested in Euro 7 technology will return five times more benefits in terms of health and environment protection costs. Now that discussions on the legislative proposal are at a decisive point, the industrial sectors represented by the signatories below call on EU institutions to take an ambitious and future-oriented position on Euro  7 including for exhaust and non-exhaust, i.e. evaporative and refuelling systems, brakes and tyres; as well as for reagent quality requirements and the durability of batteries, without undue delay. Signatories AECC – Association for Emissions Control by Catalyst  CECRA – Voice of European vehicle dealers and repairers CEFIC AGU – Automotive Grade Urea Sector Group CITA – International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee CLEPA – European Association of Automotive Suppliers IPA – International Platinum Group Metals Association MECA – Trade association of companies supplying clean mobility technologies

Members of the European Parliament,
Ministers of the 27 EU Member States,

Last year, the European Commission proposed a new Euro 7 pollutant emissions standard for new vehicle types, after years of collecting evidence and data.

The European Union needs a timely and well-targeted Euro 7 legislation for cars, vans, trucks and buses to improve the health and wellbeing of its citizens and urban population in particular. Cities cannot be left alone to improve air quality with the limited resources available to them. Euro 7 will make it easier for national and local administrations to deliver on ambient air quality commitments currently being upgraded by EU legislation. While the shift to electromobility is underway, 100 million new vehicles with an internal combustion engine are expected to be sold in the EU in the next decade and will remain on European roads for years to come. Electrification and continued improvement of conventional engines are complementary approaches and should work hand in hand to achieve significant pollution reductions.

Europe needs more ambitious standards and must maintain its global leadership alongside the US and China, which are also adopting more ambitious pollutant regulations. European vehicle manufacturers will need to invest in these other regions in adopting advanced technologies anyway to remain competitive in the global market.

New Euro 7 rules need to be adopted within the current legislative period, to ensure that citizens living in cities can continue to benefit as soon as possible from improving air quality facilitated by reduced vehicle pollution. Emission control systems meeting the Commission proposal requirements are already mature and available, as shown by data collected during robust road testing by various technology providers. The timely availability of mature affordable emission control systems meeting the requirements of the Commission proposal has been demonstrated by data collected during robust road testing by various technology providers. To facilitate, implementing and delegated acts should be swiftly adopted after the legislation, with the most important parameters already developed in parallel in the coming months. This early development of the regulatory detail is critical to a successful implementation, providing industry with confidence to invest, and enabling the path to cleaner road transport and improved public health.

Further, Euro 7 emission testing procedures need enhancement compared to Euro 6/VI, in combination with the ambitious limit values and lifetime requirements proposed by the Commission, to reflect driving conditions and the actual environmental impact of different vehicle types in the real world. The Commission’s proposed new testing rules will, with certain improvements to ensure representativeness of on-road testing, strike a good balance between what is necessary and what is feasible. They will ensure that emissions from trucks especially will be controlled under true real-world conditions.

As the necessary technologies are already known, the most accurate cost analysis of Euro 7 demonstrates that the price to pay for industry and consumers is moderate. Euro 7 vehicles will remain affordable, while according to the Commission’s own calculations, every euro invested in Euro 7 technology will return five times more benefits in terms of health and environment protection costs.

Now that discussions on the legislative proposal are at a decisive point, the industrial sectors represented by the signatories below call on EU institutions to take an ambitious and future-oriented position on Euro  7 including for exhaust and non-exhaust, i.e. evaporative and refuelling systems, brakes and tyres; as well as for reagent quality requirements and the durability of batteries, without undue delay.

Signatories
AECC – Association for Emissions Control by Catalyst
CECRA – Voice of European vehicle dealers and repairers
CEFIC AGU – Automotive Grade Urea Sector Group
CITA – International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee
CLEPA – European Association of Automotive Suppliers
IPA – International Platinum Group Metals Association
MECA – Trade association of companies supplying clean mobility technologies

 

CLEPA | Joint call to stimulate the European automotive industry’s transformation and enhance competitiveness

Open letter to the President of the European Commission,
Ursula von der Leyen

Dear President,

The signatories of this open letter support the European Commission’s renewed focus on a competitive automotive industry in Europe and wish to thank you for the constructive dialogue.

All signatories represent the broad spectrum of the automotive value chain and are committed to shaping the green and digital transition. We proactively contributed to DG GROW’s transition pathways exercise. Since DG GROW initiated this exercise, geopolitical challenges have put additional pressure on the decarbonisation of transport.

Failure to act now within the current mandate risks further delays that will inevitably undermine the European automotive industry’s transformation and competitiveness. It will also put at risk employment in an industry that generates more than 13 million jobs in the EU. The European Commission must urgently establish a robust framework to manage these challenges and prioritise six key actions.

I.    Develop a robust industrial strategy
China provides a telling example of a targeted industrial strategy supporting a globally competitive, domestic auto industry in electromobility. The US Inflation Reduction Act also shows that a robust industrial policy framework can trigger hundreds of billions in private investment . The EU must develop a robust industrial strategy that guarantees a level playing field (outside and within the EU), provides a stable investment environment and fosters a competitive automotive industry and industry manufacturing in Europe. This includes a competitive regulatory framework, the availability and simplicity of financial resources to stimulate industrial investment in innovative green and digital technologies and production methods in Europe with guarantees to ensure the retention and creation of quality jobs while ensuring fair distribution of profits and not surpassing the needs of the SMEs. A crucial pillar of a robust industrial strategy will be to secure reliable energy sources at competitive prices, which will reduce costs for citizens and businesses.

II.    Scale up a European zero emission market and battery value chain
Achieving road transport decarbonisation depends on the entire value chain for zero-emission vehicles. In addition to the Critical Raw Materials and Net-Zero Industry Acts, the EU needs a strong response to the US Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) to boost investment in the European battery value chain and other components that are crucial to improving the environmental performance of vehicles.  Europe should reduce dependency on critical parts of the value chain from third countries. The regulatory framework for batteries, drive trains, recyclability, and circular economy must be clear, coherent, and stimulate investment in Europe. Support for the battery and drive train value chain should be complemented with a robust hydrogen strategy, both with regard to industrial and mobility applications.

III.    Ensure a stable and coherent regulatory environment for the sector
The current fragmentation of the EU regulatory framework for the sector creates a context of uncertainty that undermines investment and weakens market demand. The EU should complete the Single Market (including the recharging and refuelling infrastructure as well as electricity) and remove barriers for cross-border trade. The Commission should make proposals to streamline and better articulate regulations, reaffirming the importance of technological neutrality supporting innovation and competition. The Commission should also conduct extensive impact assessments and competitiveness checks before proposing new regulations, including closely monitoring investment and innovation capacity. In particular, restrictions on the use of substances critical for the performance and durability of batteries, semiconductors, and other critical technologies should be assessed carefully.

IV.    Enhance the skills agenda and Just Transition framework
The green and digital transformation must go hand in hand with a Just Transition. The EU must champion a transformation roadmap, especially for regions reliant on the automotive sector. The automotive social partners, European Automotive Regions Alliance and Automotive Skills Alliance should play a leading role in this transformation plan. The Commission should also do more to boost digital skills for a high-tech auto industry.

V.    Improve transport affordability
The EU should ensure affordable and sustainable mobility for all while industry is intensifying its efforts to produce vehicles and services affordable to all. Coordinated incentives should support green investment and repairability across the full aftermarket chain, eg vehicle acquisition in new and second-hand markets. Incentives can enhance affordability, especially as rising costs have eroded European purchasing power.

VI.    Ensure a global level playing field 
Automotive and two- and three-wheeler vehicles provide good examples of changing global trade relationships. State aid policies in third countries put European manufacturing competitiveness at risk. Diversification of the supply of raw materials should be a central pillar of the EU’s trade strategy, including the ratification of existing trade agreements and the negotiation of raw material partnerships.

The signatories of this open letter recognise the critical situation for the European automotive industry. We are committed to decarbonising transport and keeping jobs and automotive manufacturing in Europe. The European Commission should take account of these challenges, and we hope we can jointly secure the European automotive industry’s transformation and European welfare.

Yours sincerely,

Sigrid de Vries, Director General of ACEA
Antonio Perlot, Secretary General of ACEM
Bernard Lycke, Director General of CECRA
Delphine Rudelli, Director General of Ceemet
Benjamin Krieger, Secretary General of CLEPA
Adam McCarty, Secretary General of ETRMA
René Schroeder, Executive Director of EUROBAT
Judith Kirton-Darling and Isabelle Barthes – Joint Acting General Secretaries of IndustriALL

 

 

CLEPA 2023 General Assembly elects new leadership

In the context of its General Assembly, CLEPA, the European association of automotive suppliers, approved its membership composition, annual accounts and its new statutes. CLEPA members elected Mr Matthias Zink, CEO Automotive Technologies at Schaeffler, as incoming President of CLEPA. Mr Zink will assume the role in January 2024, succeeding Mr Thorsten Muschal, Executive Vice President of Sales at FORVIA, who has successfully led the association over the last four years.  

in CLEPA, 27-07-2023


Expressing his enthusiasm for the new role, Mr Zink states, “As the group representing the interests of the European automotive supplier industry, CLEPA has a significant role to play in the process of shaping more modern and sustainable automotive mobility. CLEPA’s task is to ensure that the interests of all stakeholders are taken into account during this process. I am pleased that I will be able to support and help shape this important function in a key position together with other sector colleagues from the beginning of the coming year.?As a European and as a businessman, I am convinced that the relevance of CLEPA will significantly increase during the next few years, not least to ensure that European interests are heard at an international level.” 

Reflecting on his term, Mr Muschal notes, “I am proud of the achievements we have made together at CLEPA, especially considering the unprecedented challenges we have faced over the past three years. The transition is only beginning, and it is crucial that we continue to work together towards shared objectives. I look forward to actively carrying out my full mandate, and to the handover with Mr Zink.” 

The CLEPA General Assembly served as an important forum for cooperation, empowering the association’s members to tackle industry challenges collectively and promote a harmonised approach towards the mobility transformation in Europe. 

The CLEPA membership is presently composed of more than 140 members, including 116 corporate members, 12 national associations and 19 associate members. Since June 2022, CLEPA has welcomed 12 new members, reinforcing its position as the voice of the sector. The most recent members are:  

  • Aurobay  
  • BASF 
  • DuPont 
  • FEV 
  • Harman 
  • Klimator  
  • Qualcomm 
  • Tallano Technologies 
  • STMicroelectronics 
  • Stratvision  
  • Swissmem 
  • Wayve 

 

 

CLEPA | Automotive and battery manufacturing coalition signs joint letter of concern on Carbon Footprint Rules for Electric Vehicle Batteries

The EU JRC (Joint Research Centre) has recently issued a final draft of the “Rules for the calculation of the Carbon Footprint of Electric Vehicle Batteries (CFB-EV)”, entering a phase of consultation. Battery and automotive manufacturing organisations have jointly addressed representatives from the European Commission (DG GROW and DG ENV) with a letter of concern regarding these Rules.

in CLEPA, 27-07-2023


“While the effort to regulate and provide additional guidance on the carbon footprint calculation of electric vehicle (EV) batteries is both sensible and appreciated, the draft contains some aspects that raise concerns for the industry, particularly regarding the assessment of the impact of recycled material (and the so-called modelling of the “end-of-life”)”, they write.

The JRC document proposes to apply the so-called Circular Footprint Formula (CFF) to the calculation of battery carbon footprint, in reference to the Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) method, as a way to model the end-of-life of EV batteries. The coalition raises that this calculation not only adds a significant complexity burden for practitioners and reporting companies, but also deviates from other globally recognised accounting practices. Therefore, they recommend EU institutions to use the widely adopted and recognised “cut-off” approach for the modelling of end-of-life of EV batteries, instead of the CFF.

 

 

Forum on Automotive Aftermarket Sustainability to officially establish as new European association

  • Leading players in the aftermarket sector consolidate efforts to drive innovative sustainability solutions and best practices through new EU association
  • Official presentation to take place during FAAS Sustainability Day at FuturMotive Congress on 16-18 November in Bologna

in CLEPA, 14-07-2023


Just nine months after its successful launch last September, the Forum on association. Comprising 28 prominent members, the FAAS is a forward-thinking initiative dedicated to advancing sustainability, promoting greener practices, and delivering solutions within the automotive aftermarket sector. Automotive Aftermarket Sustainability (FAAS) announces the formation of a legally registered, non-profit European association. Comprising 28 prominent members, the FAAS is a forward-thinking initiative dedicated to advancing sustainability, promoting greener practices, and delivering solutions within the automotive aftermarket sector.

Under the guidance of the FAAS Secretariat, initiated by CLEPA (the European Association of Automotive Suppliers) and FIGIEFA (the European Association of Automotive Aftermarket Distributors), preparations are underway to establish a governance structure, formalise the FAAS as a legal entity, and launch an awareness campaign to expand its membership base. Additionally, the new association is set to introduce new membership categories to foster broader participation and engagement.

The official presentation of this initiative will take place during the highly anticipated FAAS Sustainability Day, scheduled for 16-18 November in Bologna as part of the ‘FuturMotive’ Congress. Laurence Eeckhout, FAAS coordinator on behalf of FIGIEFA, shares the enthusiasm shown by the unanimous support from members during the recent plenary meeting: “We are pleased that members are engaged in a journey where actors in the aftermarket sector are joining forces to enhance collaboration, exchange best practices, and foster sustainable initiatives that will have a lasting impact along the entire supply chain. Together, we anticipate substantial growth in our membership,  as well as the optimisation of packaging, re-use and re-manufacturing of parts, and digitalisation of  logistics.”

Frank Schlehuber, CLEPA’s Senior Consultant Market Affairs, emphasised the importance of collective action within the automotive aftermarket: “While numerous stakeholders operate within the industry, we all share a common goal. Effecting meaningful change requires the acceptance and support of all market players. Therefore, a joint initiative involving stakeholders across the value chain is essential to achieve swift and impactful results.”

The mission of the FAAS

The FAAS represents a unique collaborative endeavour initiated by CLEPA and FIGIEFA, uniting  the automotive aftermarket supply chain in a holistic pursuit  of greener and more sustainable solutions for the European aftermarket.

To achieve its sustainability objectives, the FAAS currently operates four working groups comprising a wide range of relevant actors from the European automotive industry:

  • Working Group 1: Conducting a comprehensive study to assess the CO2 footprint of the automotive aftermarket sector and the CO2 impact of maintaining a vehicle on the road for longer vs. replacing it with a new vehicle.
  • Working Group 2: Addressing existing barriers to component remanufacturing through improved knowledge and understanding, while emphasising the significant contribution of remanufacturing to the circular economy, with the aim to increase the market share of remanufactured products.
  • Working Group 3: Developing a standardised Product Carbon Footprint methodology applicable to all players in the automotive aftermarket sector, consistent with other initiatives in Europe.
  • Working Group 4: Focusing on optimising supply chain logistics by forming strategic partnerships between suppliers and wholesalers, and developing recommendations to reduce the environmental footprint of shipping.

 

CLEPA | Advancing EU leadership towards climate-neutral mobility: New position paper on CO2 emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles

  • CLEPA supports the revision of CO2 emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles as part of the EU’s objective to reach climate neutrality by 2050
  • Technology diversity is essential for operators to select the ideal clean technology for specific use-cases, enabling a competitive and efficient freight transport sector
  • Ambitious CO2 targets require equally ambitious enabling conditions at both the EU and Member State level, necessitating substantial additional investments

in CLEPA, 29-06-2023


In June 2019, the European Union implemented its initial CO2 emission performance standards for heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), marking a significant milestone. These standards aimed to achieve a 15% reduction in average CO2 emissions of newly registered HDVs in 2025 and a 30% reduction from 2030 onwards, compared to a baseline set in 2019/2020.

In addition to the EU’s ‘Fit for 55’ package of energy and climate legislation, the European Commission presented a legislative proposal for revised HDV CO2 emission performance standards on 14 February 2023. The proposal expands the scope to cover additional vehicle groups, sets more ambitious CO2 reduction target for 2030, and introduces new targets for 2035 and 2040.

HDVs play a vital role in the prosperity of the Single Market as well as local and regional economies. From medium-sized trailers to long-haul trucks, these vehicles have diverse use-cases, ranging from carrying heavy loads up mountains, to facilitating urban deliveries, requiring a variety of technology options that best fit the need.

CLEPA’s new position paper therefore underscores the importance of granting operators the flexibility to choose the preferred clean technology for specific use-cases, enabling a competitive and efficient transport sector. Battery-electric vehicles (BEVs), fuel-cell electric vehicles (FCEVs), H2-engine vehicles, and electrified trailers should all be classified as zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) and treated as equally viable options for meeting future CO2 fleet standards. Additionally, the standards should incorporate a method to account for CO2 savings achieved through the use of low-carbon and carbon-neutral fuels, promoting the adoption of all valid technologies and maximising overall emission reduction.

CLEPA Secretary General, Benjamin Krieger, notes “The proposed CO2 emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles are an ambitious step towards achieving climate neutrality. To foster a successful transition, it is crucial to grant operators the flexibility to choose the most suitable clean technology for their specific needs. This will promote healthy competition and optimise transportation operations while enabling the adoption of all valid technologies and maximising overall emission reductions.”

Further, enabling conditions must be in place to achieve the proposed CO2 reduction targets for HDVs. The position highlights the need for robust measures at both the EU and Member State level to support the necessary investments in low and zero-emission vehicles. In particular, establishing adequate charging and refuelling infrastructure is essential. Without sufficient enabling conditions, even the existing CO2 reduction targets will be challenging to achieve. To meet the proposed targets for 2030, 2035, and 2040, substantial additional investments are required.

CLEPA emphasises the importance of regular assessment of enabling conditions and periodic evaluation of the legislation’s effectiveness. The paper recommends conducting the first review by 2027 to ensure timely adjustments if necessary.

The position paper also supports the inclusion of new vehicle groups in the proposed legislation. CLEPA endorses the rapid adoption of type-approval for electrified trailers and the swift incorporation of energy-efficient options for trailers into VECTO. Furthermore, the paper highlights the need for sufficient lead time and established annual reduction rates for newly included vehicle groups.

 

Download CLEPA’s position paper on CO2 emission standards for HDV

 

 

CLEPA | EU co-legislators reach agreement on the Data Act – a sector-specific legislation must now quickly follow

  • The Data Act agreement in trilogue is expected to allow third-parties to provide innovative services to the end user, but will need a complementary regulation that addresses the complexities of the deployment of data-based services in the auto sector
  • A prompt publication of the sector-specific proposal is necessary to improve competition, boost innovation capabilities, and protect consumer rights and choice

in CLEPA, 28-06-2023


Negotiators from the European Parliament and the Council of the EU reached an agreement last night on the Data Act legislation, which will regulate how data generated by connected objects can be accessed and shared.

Automotive technology is rapidly advancing, with vehicles generating and collecting ever greater quantities of data to operate and monitor systems. This data offers a huge potential to improve and develop new services for the benefit of consumers. However, automotive suppliers and other third-party service providers currently rely on the willingness and conditions of a limited group of market players to provide access to this data. Such a level of control on the market carries the risk of creating “gatekeepers,” with a detrimental effect on fair competition, innovation, and consumer choice. Both personal cars and commercials trucks are affected by this issue.

CLEPA, the European Association of Automotive Suppliers, welcomes the conclusion of the negotiations on the Data Act. The final agreement has yet to be reviewed in detail to assess the latest changes. Overall, CLEPA expects this horizontal legislation will be an important first step towards improving the situation by ensuring that third-parties can provide innovative services to the end user. Moreover, the association welcomes that this legislative text puts the consumer at the centre and imposes obligations on data holders.

Nevertheless, the Data Act alone will be insufficient to fully address the complexities of the deployment of data-based services in the automotive sector. Therefore, we strongly advocate for the swift publication of the proposal for a complementing sector-specific regulation, which is currently being drafted by the European Commission and has been publicly confirmed. The Parliament and Council made the Data Act a priority and managed to conclude complex discussions in a very short time period. We now call on the Commission to dedicate the same effort towards the sector-specific legislation and publish its proposal by the end of the summer.

“A prompt publication of the sector-specific proposal on access to in-vehicle data, functions, and resources by the Commission will contribute to improving competition, boosting innovation capabilities of thousands of automotive supply companies, and will protect consumer rights and choice,” says CLEPA’s Secretary General Benjamin Krieger. “The technical work and discussions behind this legislation have been going on for years. It is now time for the proposal to be finalised and published.”

Earlier this year, CLEPA published a position paper looking at the complexities of vehicle data services in the European mobility ecosystem. You can read it here.

 

 

CLEPA | Commission takes a step in the recognition of automotive suppliers’ contribution to sustainable economy

  • Climate Delegated Act incorporates the production of powertrain components including e-motors, power electronics, thermal management and braking systems in its definition of sustainable economic activities
  • Critical activities are still at risk of being overlooked by capital markets

in CLEPA, 14-06-2023


The European taxonomy regulation aims to direct investments towards sustainable commercial activities. This means that, over the coming years, the sustainability level of each business activity will influence its access to funding. On 13 June, the European Commission presented new proposals for delegated acts that amend and complement the classification scheme for sustainable business activities. CLEPA welcomes this initiative and sees the delegated acts as a step forward in the acknowledgment of automotive suppliers’ contribution to a sustainable economy and their role in the advancement of green mobility in the EU.

Originally, the taxonomy regulation did not recognise the economic activities related to the production of e-mobility components as ‘sustainable’, while the assembly of electric vehicles was considered as such. The proposed amendment to the Climate Delegated Act will recognise a significant share of the manufacturing of powertrain components, including power electronics, thermal management and braking components, as contributing to the environmental performance of the car, if installed in a zero-emission vehicle. For automotive suppliers, the delegated act marks a crucial first step to improve the level playing field and secure funding for critical supply chain elements and zero-emission mobility.

The circularity chapter of the Delegated Act on non-climate environmental objectives gives much-needed recognition to the sustainability contribution of some aftermarket-related activities, but so far excludes the design for circularity and remains ambiguous on remanufacturing actions by automotive suppliers. As a result, critical activities by automotive suppliers remain at risk of being overlooked by capital markets and could suffer from underinvestment. The use of low carbon/recovered materials, lightweighting, and product robustness should be considered in future revisions of the taxonomy.

In order to establish a fair and level playing field within the automotive sector, future improvements are needed. Many automotive supply companies continue to face unequal competition with OEMs, who can claim eligibility for the revenue generated by a sold vehicle whose value is generated by all components, while the manufacturing activities of a large share of these components remains non-eligible.

Unless Member states or the European Parliament object to the publication, the delegated acts will enter into force after a period of four months. CLEPA stands ready to support the European Commission in the development of a comprehensive pathway towards a fair taxonomy that effectively recognises the valuable contributions of all automotive suppliers in mitigating climate change, preventing pollution, and promoting circularity.