CLEPA Joint Statement | Europe’s Consumers, Independent Automotive Service and Mobility Providers rally for urgent Commission action on vehicle data legislation

Europe’s Consumers, Independent Automotive Service and Mobility Providers rally for urgent Commission action on vehicle data legislation

in CLEPA, 19-01-2024


  • Europe’s independent service providers and consumers reiterate the significant potential for safer, smarter and more affordable mobility that is being sacrificed due to the lack of regulated access to vehicle data.
  • Vehicle manufacturers have quasi-monopoly control over data generated by vehicles owned by European consumers and businesses. This heavily limits the choice of innovative services that independent service providers could provide – if they had equal access to vehicle data.
  • The group calls on President von der Leyen to urgently deliver the legislative proposal on access to vehicle data that has been eight years in the making.

A group of 10 representatives of independent automotive service providers have called on President von der Leyen and the College of Commissioners to urgently deliver sector-specific legislation on access to vehicle data. Together they represent 80% of the European automotive economy and include the continent’s automotive parts suppliers and distributors, workshops and their technology suppliers, mobility services companies, the insurance industry and consumers.

The majority of modern vehicles are connected and offer immense potential for safer, smarter and more affordable mobility for European consumers and businesses.

However, manufacturers’ quasi-monopoly control of vehicle data is impeding the development of services that independent service providers could offer. This limits service innovation and competition, restricting consumer and business choice, driving up prices and erodes Europe’s competitive position globally.

The group stresses the European Commission’s long-promised plan for a sector-specific legislation on access to in-vehicle data, functions, and resources is more necessary than ever. The Data Act neither addresses the quasi-monopolistic market structure nor the technical requirements in the automotive industry to make equitable data access a reality.

Action is urgent due to the regulatory cliff-edge in July when new cybersecurity laws kick in, potentially leading to the progressive shutdown of the only independent means of remote access to vehicle data (via the on-board diagnostic port).

The EU must urgently put in place equal access to vehicle-generated data for all market actors by delivering sector-specific legislation that protects consumer choice and encourages real competition and investment in digital transformation and data-driven businesses. Each day of delay stifles European innovation, job creation and the safer, smarter, more sustainable and affordable mobility that Europe’s citizens and businesses deserve.

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“FIA members continuously seek to develop consumer services in mobility and beyond. But our efforts are hampered through the low quality, scarce and costly data made available by vehicle manufacturers. Fair access to vehicle data is essential in unlocking the full potential of innovative services, beneficial for consumers and all players in the aftermarket. A level playing field is needed to favour innovation for all players and not only a few.”

Karsten Schulze, ADAC Technical Services President.

 

“Ensuring full and real-time data access is essential for fleet companies to be able to offer smart, sustainable, and affordable mobility to their clients. There is no further time to lose as the automotive industry is moving at very high pace and the independent service providers risk losing their competitive position. Thus, we ask President von der Leyen to urgently deliver the legislative proposal on access to in-vehicle data.”

Tim Albertsen, Group Chief Executive Office of Ayvens (formerly ALD Automotive I LeasePlan).

 

“There is currently no level playing field in accessing vehicle data which is stifling competition and innovation. The European Commission must stop dragging its feet and urgently put forward EU regulation. This will enable insurers to provide better products and services to support the climate transition and improve road safety. It will also help them understand and manage the risks related to new and future forms of mobility, such as autonomous driving. Opening data access will prevent a few big companies controlling data and instead create a competitive market that delivers for Europeans.

Yann Arnaud, Director of Responses to Customer Needs & Innovation at MACIF, the French insurer, speaking on behalf of the European insurance sector.

 

“Leveraging anonymized vehicle intelligence and linked tyre data provides a tremendous opportunity for building creative solutions that will shape the future of mobility.”

Raghunath Banerjee, Vice President of Data Solutions at Bridgestone Mobility Solutions.

 

“Investments in services based on in-vehicle generated data require a stable and predictable business environment. A sector specific regulation is needed to create such environment.”

Benjamin Krieger, Secretary General of CLEPA.

 


About CLEPA

  • CLEPA, the European Association of Automotive Suppliers based in Brussels, represents over 3,000 companies, from multi-nationals to SMEs, supplying state-of-the-art components and innovative technology for safe, smart and sustainable mobility, investing over €30 billion yearly in research and development. Automotive suppliers in Europe directly employ 1.7 million people in the EU.

 

 

CLEPA Press Release | Substantial additional investments will be needed to reach ambitious CO2 standards for trucks

The European Commission, the Council of the European Union and the European Parliament have reached an agreement on the CO2 emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles today. While the political agreement positively includes electrified trailers and hydrogen engines, it falls short of embracing carbon neutral fuels.

in CLEPA, 18-01-2024


Benjamin Krieger, Secretary General of CLEPA, the European association of automotive suppliers, says, “We see positive movement with the inclusion of hydrogen fuelled engines and eTrailers, however, the role of renewable fuels as a complement to e-mobility still needs to be clearly defined.”

The review and assessment of the regulation will be essential to ensure the feasibility of the interim and longer-term targets which are the most ambitious targets to date and will be extremely challenging to achieve. A CO2 reduction of 45% by 2030 will require more than 400,000 zero-emission trucks on the roads – around 100,000 new zero-emissions trucks registered annually. Currently, less than 1% of newly registered trucks are electric, and many of the enabling conditions are lacking*.

Mr. Krieger goes on to say, “Progress towards electrification of the fleet and deployment of enabling conditions should be thoroughly reviewed in 2027, and if necessary, we should remain open to considering all technology options to reach compliance.”

The agreement will still need to be formally adopted in the coming weeks.

 

*Source: Statista, ACEA, European Commission, FuelsEurope

 

 

CLEPA PRESS RELEASE | Matthias Zink to serve as new CLEPA President

CLEPA, the European Association of Automotive Suppliers, has elected Matthias Zink as its new President for a two-year term starting in January 2024.

in CLEPA, 09-01-2024


Mr Zink is CEO Automotive Technologies at Schaeffler and will succeed Thorsten Muschal who has held the position since 2020.

“CLEPA represents over 3,000 companies, from multi-nationals to SMEs, supplying state-of-the-art components and innovative technology for safe, smart, and sustainable mobility across Europe. As the largest private investor in R&D, with 30 billion EUR invested annually, the automotive supply sector is critical to enabling the green and digital transition in Europe. Keeping Europe competitive is a task for policymakers and industry alike”, said Mr Zink. “I wish to thank Thorsten Muschal for his four, successful years as CLEPA President, and I look forward to building on the work done and help strengthen the voice of our industry.”

Reflecting on his term, Mr Muschal notes, “I am proud of the achievements we have made together at CLEPA, especially considering the unprecedented challenges we have faced over the past three years. The transition is only beginning, and it is crucial that we continue to work together towards shared objectives.”

While vehicle production has gone up post-Covid, suppliers have managed to reduce CO2 emissions by increasing the use of renewable energy. However, this positive trajectory can only be maintained with continued significant investments to meet the goals of the green transition whilst remaining globally competitive.

“Affordable renewable energy, raw materials shortages, insufficient battery productions capacity in the EU, along with large infrastructure and grid needs demand a technology-diverse approach. The regulatory framework must remain ambitious yet flexible to empower continuous innovation and to keep Europe competitive”, said Zink. “At CLEPA, we stand ready to bring technological mobility solutions to market and to actively contribute to shaping policies that foster climate action and support a thriving EU industry.”

Watch Matthias Zink’s full video statement below.

 


 

About Matthias Zink

  • Matthias Zink is based at the headquarters of Schaeffler’s Automotive Technologies division in Bühl, Germany, where he became the CEO of Schaeffler’s Automotive Technologies division in 2017. Besides his position as CEO of Schaeffler’s Automotive Technologies he assumed responsibility for the Engine Systems and Chassis Systems business divisions as well as Global Key Account Management Automotive in 2019.

About CLEPA

  • CLEPA, the European Association of Automotive Suppliers based in Brussels, represents over 3,000 companies, from multi-nationals to SMEs, supplying state-of-the-art components and innovative technology for safe, smart and sustainable mobility, investing over €30 billion yearly in research and development. Automotive suppliers in Europe directly employ 1.7 million people in the EU.

 

ATEQ joins AFIA

ATEQ is now a worldwide company with offices in 40 countries selling and servicing more than 275,000 leak testers installed in more than 5,000 customers worldwide.

in AFIA, 24-10-2023


From its position as the world leader in Leak Test technologies for assembly lines, ATEQ has developed a whole range of industrial quality control equipment ranging from electrical testers to pressure and flow calibrators as well as pressure and flow calibration services traceable to all international standards.

Whatever your production activity is, we are capable of testing your products during all the process: automotive, e-mobility, aviation applications, medical, cosmetic, packaging, food industry.

https://www.ateq.pt/

 

CLEPA Press release | Environment Committee rejects improved pollutant emission standards

In a parallel move to the Council of the European Union, the European Parliament’s Committee for Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) has voted today, weakening the European Commission’s proposal to enhance air quality across Europe. The committee adopted a set of compromise amendments, which entail a longer implementation timeline for heavy-duty vehicles, marginally stricter limit values, and weakened testing conditions. Proposals for slightly more ambitious rules were dismissed in the vote by the committee.

in CLEPA, 12-10-2023


Benjamin Krieger, Secretary General of CLEPA, the association of European automotive suppliers, says:

“A weak Euro 7, with delayed implementation, will neither support cleaner air, nor stimulate innovation in the EU. Despite progress on e-mobility, the EU is projected to sell 100 million conventionally powered cars in the next decade. The technology for a more ambitious Euro 7 is there, and it’s economically viable. Europe should not lag behind China and the US, who have both set ambitious targets on pollutant emissions.”

The ENVI Committee is the leading group for Euro 7 in the Parliament and sets the tone for the institution’s overall position, which is slated for November’s plenary session.

“Looking ahead to the plenary vote, we call for further improvements, such as shortening the implementation dates and tightening limit values and testing conditions as this will pave the way for a cleaner and more competitive future mobility.”

Once the Parliament has reached its position, inter-institutional negotiations between the Commission, Parliament and Council will begin and decide the fate of Euro 7 pollutant emission standards in Europe.

 

 

Joint statement on the importance of fluoropolymers for the clean energy transition and the EU’s Net Zero Industry

The automotive industry is an important downstream user of PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), including fluoropolymers, fluorinated gases, and short-chain PFAS. Fluoropolymers are used for several key technical components in the twin digital and green transition, including semiconductors and batteries.

in CLEPA, 04-10-2023


The Per- and polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) restriction proposal drafted by five European countries and presented to the European Chemical Agency (ECHA) in January 2023 is an important pillar of the EU’s Chemicals Strategy. CLEPA and 14 other signatories, representing the key sectors in the achievement of the EU’s strategic autonomy, have published a joint statement where they acknowledge the rationale of the proposal to restrict and further regulate PFAS and support the ECHA in such efforts. However, the restriction proposal fails to recognise that fluoropolymers meet OECD requirements as polymers of low concern.

With the proper legislative framework in place to address fluoropolymers’ lifecycle emissions, the European Commission and ECHA should grant an exemption for fluoropolymer production (including relevant raw materials) and its use in industrial applications.

 

Download statement

 

 

CLEPA | Member states reject stricter vehicle pollutant standards

  • In the next decade, an estimated 100 million conventionally powered vehicles will be sold in the EU
  • The Commission’s proposal could be effectively implemented with a few prudent safeguards
  • Regressing to Euro 6 will neither support stricter air quality limits nor stimulate innovation in the EU

in CLEPA, 26-09-2023


The Member states’ governments within the Council adopted yesterday the general approach for Euro 7. This forms the foundation for forthcoming negotiations with the European Parliament regarding the next phase of regulations on vehicle pollutant emissions.

Member states are lending their support to test conditions and limit values for cars, vans, and trucks that overall align more closely with the existing Euro 6/VI standards rather than the Commission’s proposed revisions, providing little, if any, contribution to improved air quality. The Council did not retain the new refuelling emissions requirements nor the reduced evaporative limits proposed by the Commission but did preserve the inclusion of limit values for tires and brakes.

Benjamin Krieger, the Secretary General of CLEPA, the association representing the European automotive supply industry, remarks, “Automotive suppliers support the advancement of Euro 7, with realistic testing conditions and limits. The Commission’s proposal could be effectively implemented with a few prudent safeguards. The required technology is available and economically viable. Regressing to Euro 6, as proposed by the Council, is not needed to maintain affordable mobility and will neither support implementing stricter air quality limits nor stimulate innovation in the EU. In the next decade, an estimated 100 million conventionally powered vehicles will be sold in the EU. This decision now determines whether the EU will have a role in shaping technology standards or leaves this prerogative to the United States and China.”

Bernard Lycke, Director General of CECRA representing cars, vans and truck dealers agents and repairers at European level, encourages the co-legislators to continue working on robust Euro 7 standards and their adoption before the upcoming EU elections in June 2024.

“This is crucial to enable a quick implementation of the new Euro 7 legislation. Indeed, millions of vehicles with internal combustion engines will continue to be sold, maintained and repaired in the next years and these should contribute to air quality improvements.”

A decision regarding the European Parliament’s position is anticipated on 12 October. Following the adoption of positions by both institutions, the Parliament and the Council, negotiations in the trilogue phase will commence.

 

 

CLEPA |

epresenting the automotive supply and road transport sectors, CLEPA and IRU have addressed a letter to Members of the European Parliament calling for their support in preserving essential technology options under the new CO2 standards proposal.

in CLEPA, 14-09-2023


The signatories raise that the performance of the future EU road transport sector will very much depend on the technology options allowed by the CO2 standards regulation, as well as the enabling conditions required to successfully decarbonise the sector. They defend that a technology-open approach that allows for the coexistence of various vehicle propulsion systems is critical for the efficient operation of the single market, including for emergency responses to all types of crises.

The letter proposes 5 key recommendations for the CO2 regulation standards, to ensure technology diversity and guarantee an efficient decarbonisation of the freight transport sector:

  1. Leave adequate space for carbon-neutral fuels in heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) as a long-term solution for sustainable road transport alongside electrification and hydrogen
  2. Implement essential enabling conditions to achieve ambitious CO2 targets and ensure timely assessment of the legislation’s effectiveness
  3. Exempt high-capacity vehicles from the targets
  4. Include new vehicle groups to the CO2 emission reduction targets for heavy-duty vehicles
  5. Support regional passenger transport by reshuffling bus and coach targets

 

In the letter, CLEPA and IRU also raise that, for a well-functioning and stable EU mobility and logistics sector, the EU should allow transport companies to decide which technology is the most suitable for the various types of operations to achieve the common goal of carbon neutrality.

 

READ MORE

 

CLEPA | European automotive suppliers call on EU institutions to prioritise the adoption of the Critical Raw Materials Act and expedite trilogue negotiations

  • Electric vehicles contain over 200 kilograms of minerals versus around 40 kilograms in a conventional car
  • Current investments in raw material extraction and processing are insufficient to meet growing demand
  • The proposed regulation should accelerate investments within the EU and in strategic partner countries while promoting circularity without imposing excessive requirements

in CLEPA, 12-09-2023


The EU’s automotive supply sector heavily relies on secure access to raw materials to manufacture a wide range of innovative components crucial for advancing climate-neutral mobility, including batteries, electric motors, and lightweight parts. EU automotive suppliers urge the European Commission, Parliament and Council to prioritise the adoption of the EU Critical Raw Materials Act and to ensure trilogue negotiations start as quickly as possible.

While CLEPA acknowledges and appreciates the work done by Members of the European Parliament and Member states to bring forward amendments to the initial proposal, there are areas for improvement.

The European Commission’s proposal for a Critical Raw Materials Act indeed demonstrates the right ambitions by introducing various tools to strengthen the security of supply and resilience of supply chains. However, the initial proposal places excessive emphasis on supply chain surveillance, reporting requirements and monitoring. The regulation should include additional instruments to achieve the objective of ensuring a secure, resilient and diversified supply of raw materials. These should include support for Research & Innovation in the areas of circularity and material substitution, and the conclusion of raw material partnerships with third countries.

CLEPA has identified proposed amendments to enhance the Critical Raw Materials Act in three key aspects:

  • Improve the feasibility of achieving a secure, resilient and diversified supply of raw materials
  • Enhance focus toward strategic investments in supply chains, rather than overemphasizing supply chain surveillance and reporting requirements
  • Promote circularity by increasing material recovery rates and fostering R&I for circularity, while avoiding duplicate circularity requirements

Enhance feasibility of objectives

The Critical Raw Materials Act introduces several valuable tools for industry, including one-stop-shops to streamline regulatory requirements for expanding processing or recycling facilities, as well as setting time limits for permit approval, reducing uncertainty and fast-tracking investments. The Act also facilitates off-take agreements, coordinates and potentially supports financing for strategic raw material projects, addressing financial challenges. Proposed schemes for joint procurement can mitigate cost pressures stemming from volatile raw materials prices. To ensure successful implementation, dedicated administrative resources are essential, with a clearly defined advisory role for industry.

Sharpen focus on strategic investment

The initial proposal places excessive reliance on collective insights into the size and location of strategic stocks across a broad range of (processed) raw materials, which may not align with the needs of individual member states, industries or companies. Instead, the Act should establish a framework that reduces investment risks within the raw materials industry and fosters collaboration across the supply chain. CLEPA welcomes the proposed amendments by the European Parliament to reduce administrative burdens and supports setting clear target for strategic investment partnerships with third countries.

Foster circularity

Circularity must be a fundamental pillar of the strategy to secure the supply of raw material inputs. The proposed End –of-Life Vehicle (ELV) Regulation should be the sole legislation to introduce product-specific circularity requirements for the automotive industry, avoiding redundancy and potential regulatory conflicts. Specifically, the provision for permanent magnets in the ELV Directive (art 12 and Annex VI) deviates from the provisions in the CRMA (art. 27). ELV art. 12 rightly only introduces labeling requirements for permanent magnets that contain Neodymium-Iron-Boron or Samarium-Cobalt (no negative labelling required). Furthermore, the ELV Directive would better protect IP by no longer requiring disclosure of the chemical composition of the magnet. The Critical Raw Materials Act should play a crucial role in supporting the build-up of recycling capacities and fostering a higher recovery rate. The framework should incentivise both the recycling of post-consumer and manufacturing waste. We welcome amendments by the European Parliament to incentivise investment and public funding for R&D in the areas of circularity, design for circularity and material substitution.

 

 

 

 

CLEPA | Members of the European Parliament, Ministers of the 27 EU Member States,   Last year, the European Commission proposed a new Euro 7 pollutant emissions standard for new vehicle types, after years of collecting evidence and data. The European Union needs a timely and well-targeted Euro 7 legislation for cars, vans, trucks and buses to improve the health and wellbeing of its citizens and urban population in particular. Cities cannot be left alone to improve air quality with the limited resources available to them. Euro 7 will make it easier for national and local administrations to deliver on ambient air quality commitments currently being upgraded by EU legislation. While the shift to electromobility is underway, 100 million new vehicles with an internal combustion engine are expected to be sold in the EU in the next decade and will remain on European roads for years to come. Electrification and continued improvement of conventional engines are complementary approaches and should work hand in hand to achieve significant pollution reductions.  Europe needs more ambitious standards and must maintain its global leadership alongside the US and China, which are also adopting more ambitious pollutant regulations. European vehicle manufacturers will need to invest in these other regions in adopting advanced technologies anyway to remain competitive in the global market. New Euro 7 rules need to be adopted within the current legislative period, to ensure that citizens living in cities can continue to benefit as soon as possible from improving air quality facilitated by reduced vehicle pollution. Emission control systems meeting the Commission proposal requirements are already mature and available, as shown by data collected during robust road testing by various technology providers. The timely availability of mature affordable emission control systems meeting the requirements of the Commission proposal has been demonstrated by data collected during robust road testing by various technology providers. To facilitate, implementing and delegated acts should be swiftly adopted after the legislation, with the most important parameters already developed in parallel in the coming months. This early development of the regulatory detail is critical to a successful implementation, providing industry with confidence to invest, and enabling the path to cleaner road transport and improved public health. Further, Euro 7 emission testing procedures need enhancement compared to Euro 6/VI, in combination with the ambitious limit values and lifetime requirements proposed by the Commission, to reflect driving conditions and the actual environmental impact of different vehicle types in the real world. The Commission’s proposed new testing rules will, with certain improvements to ensure representativeness of on-road testing, strike a good balance between what is necessary and what is feasible. They will ensure that emissions from trucks especially will be controlled under true real-world conditions.   As the necessary technologies are already known, the most accurate cost analysis of Euro 7 demonstrates that the price to pay for industry and consumers is moderate. Euro 7 vehicles will remain affordable, while according to the Commission’s own calculations, every euro invested in Euro 7 technology will return five times more benefits in terms of health and environment protection costs. Now that discussions on the legislative proposal are at a decisive point, the industrial sectors represented by the signatories below call on EU institutions to take an ambitious and future-oriented position on Euro  7 including for exhaust and non-exhaust, i.e. evaporative and refuelling systems, brakes and tyres; as well as for reagent quality requirements and the durability of batteries, without undue delay. Signatories AECC – Association for Emissions Control by Catalyst  CECRA – Voice of European vehicle dealers and repairers CEFIC AGU – Automotive Grade Urea Sector Group CITA – International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee CLEPA – European Association of Automotive Suppliers IPA – International Platinum Group Metals Association MECA – Trade association of companies supplying clean mobility technologies

Members of the European Parliament,
Ministers of the 27 EU Member States,

Last year, the European Commission proposed a new Euro 7 pollutant emissions standard for new vehicle types, after years of collecting evidence and data.

The European Union needs a timely and well-targeted Euro 7 legislation for cars, vans, trucks and buses to improve the health and wellbeing of its citizens and urban population in particular. Cities cannot be left alone to improve air quality with the limited resources available to them. Euro 7 will make it easier for national and local administrations to deliver on ambient air quality commitments currently being upgraded by EU legislation. While the shift to electromobility is underway, 100 million new vehicles with an internal combustion engine are expected to be sold in the EU in the next decade and will remain on European roads for years to come. Electrification and continued improvement of conventional engines are complementary approaches and should work hand in hand to achieve significant pollution reductions.

Europe needs more ambitious standards and must maintain its global leadership alongside the US and China, which are also adopting more ambitious pollutant regulations. European vehicle manufacturers will need to invest in these other regions in adopting advanced technologies anyway to remain competitive in the global market.

New Euro 7 rules need to be adopted within the current legislative period, to ensure that citizens living in cities can continue to benefit as soon as possible from improving air quality facilitated by reduced vehicle pollution. Emission control systems meeting the Commission proposal requirements are already mature and available, as shown by data collected during robust road testing by various technology providers. The timely availability of mature affordable emission control systems meeting the requirements of the Commission proposal has been demonstrated by data collected during robust road testing by various technology providers. To facilitate, implementing and delegated acts should be swiftly adopted after the legislation, with the most important parameters already developed in parallel in the coming months. This early development of the regulatory detail is critical to a successful implementation, providing industry with confidence to invest, and enabling the path to cleaner road transport and improved public health.

Further, Euro 7 emission testing procedures need enhancement compared to Euro 6/VI, in combination with the ambitious limit values and lifetime requirements proposed by the Commission, to reflect driving conditions and the actual environmental impact of different vehicle types in the real world. The Commission’s proposed new testing rules will, with certain improvements to ensure representativeness of on-road testing, strike a good balance between what is necessary and what is feasible. They will ensure that emissions from trucks especially will be controlled under true real-world conditions.

As the necessary technologies are already known, the most accurate cost analysis of Euro 7 demonstrates that the price to pay for industry and consumers is moderate. Euro 7 vehicles will remain affordable, while according to the Commission’s own calculations, every euro invested in Euro 7 technology will return five times more benefits in terms of health and environment protection costs.

Now that discussions on the legislative proposal are at a decisive point, the industrial sectors represented by the signatories below call on EU institutions to take an ambitious and future-oriented position on Euro  7 including for exhaust and non-exhaust, i.e. evaporative and refuelling systems, brakes and tyres; as well as for reagent quality requirements and the durability of batteries, without undue delay.

Signatories
AECC – Association for Emissions Control by Catalyst
CECRA – Voice of European vehicle dealers and repairers
CEFIC AGU – Automotive Grade Urea Sector Group
CITA – International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee
CLEPA – European Association of Automotive Suppliers
IPA – International Platinum Group Metals Association
MECA – Trade association of companies supplying clean mobility technologies