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100% CO2 target discards technology options and puts jobs at risk – Statement from CLEPA’s Secretary General Sigrid de Vries

Today, a majority of the Members of the European Parliament approved the 100% target for the reduction of CO2 emission standards for new passenger cars and light-duty vehicles in 2035, as proposed by the Commission last July as part of the ‘Fit for 55’ package.

in CLEPA, 08-06-2022


On the outcome of the vote, CLEPA’s Secretary General Sigrid de Vries states:

“The transition to climate neutral mobility is well underway in our industry, but the challenges to society and the economy should not be underestimated. The targets proposed by the European Commission risk half a million auto supplier jobs in the powertrain domain until 2040.

Suppliers promote rapid electrification as well as the use of other effective options. A 100% target measured at the tailpipe is a de facto ban on the internal combustion engine, discarding years of European innovation in a technology that can be climate-neutral and is needed for a manageable and efficient transition.”

She goes on to say: “We are picking technology winners and excluding hybrid technology and sustainable renewable fuels, which are climate neutral, can be used with existing infrastructure and can also address the emissions from the existing car park. This risks making the mobility transition unnecessary challenging and even impossible for some SMEs and niche suppliers. It is good to see, however, that the EP calls for clearer criteria for the envisaged mid-term review and asks the Commission to propose a methodology to measure emissions along the life-cycle.”

With this vote, we risk a considerable relocation of the automotive industry. It’s important to note that the only region implementing a ban on technology is the EU. It means limiting consumer choice, stifling innovation and losing our competitive edge. Diversification is key to strategic autonomy, decreasing dependencies on any one technology, energy, fuel or region. Europe holds less than 1% of the global reserves of the critical materials for batteries lithium, nickel, cobalt, natural graphite, manganese. [1]

Now the debate will move to the Council of the European Union, where it will be up to the Member States to decide whether or not to confirm the proposals of the European Commission and Parliament.

 

 

[1] JRC Report: RMIS – Raw materials in the battery value chain

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