Safe handling and disposal of materials is a global goal for minimising the environmental impact of the industry

CLEPA Materials and Regulations Event 2019

in CLEPA, 23-05-2019


On May 21st and 22nd, CLEPA organised in Stuttgart, the 12th edition of its yearly “Materials Regulations Event”. The European Association of Automotive Suppliers hosted more than 200 high-level representatives from the entire automotive industry, coming from 50 countries.

The production of vehicles involves the use of a diverse range of materials, chemicals and processes. The responsibility of safe handling uses, and disposal of the products is a high priority for suppliers.  These and other key technical issues related to the use of hazardous materials and substances and the most recent legislative developments at European and international level were presented and discussed during these two days.

In her keynote speech, Sigrid de Vries, CLEPA Secretary-General highlighted “The awareness about environmental protection is increasing in society and this creates a demand for highly-efficient vehicles with a lesser impact on the ecosystem. The concept of the circular economy is already integrated throughout the vehicle production cycle, as automotive parts are designed to be sustainable across their entire lifecycle.”

The European Commission presented on the upcoming revision of the ELV (End of Life Vehicle) regulation, a fundamental tool to drive circularity in the automotive sector. The sector is continually investing in innovations in material use, design and processes that contribute to solving the current regulatory challenges.

UNECE elaborated on Global Chemicals Outlook II (GCO-II). The forecast showed that the global use of global chemicals is expected to double by 2030. Therefore, the introduction of procurement that ensures the sustainability criteria will create opportunities for the sector, that is well-positioned to stimulate innovation, including alternatives based on green and sustainable chemistry.

Also, possible Brexit scenarios were presented, and how these would have a global impact in countries which have already introduced EU chemical regulations into their regulatory framework. CLEPA highlighted how a no-deal Brexit would threaten many of the complex regulatory systems under which, the UK and European companies operate. Highly regulated sectors, including the automotive industry, as well as those that handle chemicals, are particularly at risk of being unable to do business if there is no deal.

Special attention was given to the use of plastics in the sector, following the European Commission’s plastics initiative, that proposes concrete actions designed to make the vision for a more circular plastics economy a reality. Automotive suppliers have been steadily increasing the number of sustainable materials in their parts, promoting the European leadership in global solutions that are contributing to making the transition towards a low-carbon and circular economy.

Other topics such as IMDS – International Materials Data (reporting) System 12.0 were presented, while car manufacturers stressed the importance of updating the material data accordingly for legal compliance.

In her closing remarks, Mariola Hauke, CLEPA Technical Regulations Manager highlighted that “CLEPA, via the Materials & Substances working group,  is actively involved in global issues together with other associations. Together we aim to reduce the global environmental impact of the industry and promoting business integrity.”

The 13th edition of the Materials Regulation Event is scheduled in Spring 2020 and will take place in the Stuttgart area (Germany).

 

 

Afinal, os carros elétricos não reduzem as emissões de CO2?

Os caros elétricos estão em alta na Europa, com o número de veículos a crescer em dois dígitos percentuais em quase todos os países. Mesmo assim, estes automóveis ainda constituem uma fatia pequena do parque automóvel de todo o continente. Dos 300 milhões de veículos na estrada, somente 800 mil (menos de 0,3 por cento) correspondem ainda a carros elétricos. E ainda assim, mesmo que fosse possível substituir todos os carros por elétricos, isso teria pouco impacto nas emissões de CO2 a nível mundial.

in Motor 24. 22-05-2019


É essa a opinião de Roberto Vavassori, presidente da CLEPA, associação europeu de fornecedores da indústria automóvel. Vavassori explicou na cimeira Future of the Car, organizada pelo jornal Financial Times, que “se pudéssemos substituir todos os veículos por carros elétricos amanhã, só reduzíamos as emissões globais de CO2 em 0,7 por cento”. Este número seria apenas de 0,4 por cento das emissões anuais, graças ao uso de combustíveis fósseis para produção de energia elétrica.

Assim, embora o público europeu esteja a ser direcionado para os carros elétricos, e veja os seus movimentos nas grandes cidades condicionados, não seria possível contribuir para uma redução dos gases poluentes na atmosfera. De acordo com os dados avançados pela CLEPA na cimeira, a Europa contribui apenas com 10 por cento de todas as emissões anuais de CO2 no planeta Terra, enquanto a China, Índia e Estados Unidos, menos interessados em eletrificar o seu parque automóvel, contribuem com 66 por cento das emissões.

 

 

Parliament adopts ambitious new CO2 standards for trucks

The European Parliament formally adopted today the first-ever EU Regulation on CO2 emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles. Manufacturers will have to reduce average carbon emissions by 15% by 2025 and by 30% by 2030, compared to 2019. The Parliament confirmed the targets set forward by the Commission in its legislative proposal, which will be challenging for the industry to achieve. Much will depend on the Commission quickly updating the VECTO simulation tool to account for innovative emission-reduction technologies.

in CLEPA, 18-04-2019


Sigrid de Vries, Secretary General of CLEPA, the association of automotive suppliers, commented on the vote: “Automotive suppliers are contributing actively to meet the objectives of the Paris agreement. CLEPA supports the setting of clear emission targets by the EU, although it will be challenging to achieve them for all actors involved. European trucks are already the most efficient in the world. While transport of goods has increased by over a third since 1995, emissions have barely risen. This shows how much pressure the market already exerts towards more efficient vehicles.”

The regulation on CO2 standards for heavy-duty vehicles is linked to VECTO, the tool for the simulation and certification of heavy-duty vehicles’ emissions. Only the efficiency gains that can be certified by VECTO are taken into account in the simulation of a vehicle’s emissions. Currently, the scope of VECTO only covers the tractor and a limited number of drivetrain technologies. Only once the tool will have been upgraded to take into account efficiency gains from new technologies — such as hybridisation and or trailer components — will the associated potential to reduce emissions will be unlocked. “For the regulation to efficiently achieve emission reductions, an approach is necessary which looks not only at the efficiency of the vehicle tractors but also the trailers, as well as facilitating the deployment of low carbon synthetic fuel,” explained de Vries, adding: “A comprehensive, swift, and regular upgrade of VECTO will be a key criterion for success and bring the ambitious targets of the regulation closer within reach. The Commission is tasked to deliver.”

The Regulation also includes, until 2025, a “super credit” system as a positive incentive for the deployment of zero- and low-emission vehicles, rewarding manufacturers starting from the very first zero- or low-emission vehicle placed on the market. From 2025 onwards, a minimum sales quota of 2% for zero- and low-emission vehicles will replace of the super credit. De Vries commented: “Automotive suppliers support the principle choice for a positive incentive system to pull new technologies into the market.” The Parliament was also instrumental in introducing a differentiation of the definition of low-emission vehicles per vehicle sub-group. This is expected to facilitate the development of low-emission vehicles across the entire fleet, says de Vries: “It is important to push for the development of low-emission vehicles in long-haul transport. Given the high mileage in this segment, the potential for reduction of emissions is substantial.”

Similar to the Regulation for cars and vans, the Commission is required to assess the feasibility of developing a methodology to assess heavy-duty vehicle emissions over the entire life-cycle. De Vries: “Automotive suppliers have always supported the step forward to well-to-wheel or life-cycle analysis, which should help levelling the playing field for different drivetrain technologies and take into account emissions embedded in energy production.”
The Council is also expected to formally adopt the Regulation shortly.

 

 

Parliament formally adopts important update of vehicle safety standards

The European Parliament today adopted the revision of the General Safety Regulation (GSR) during its final plenary session. The GSR will make mandatory a set of safety measures for vehicles over the coming years. The agreement should soon be approved by the Council, paving the way to a quick implementation of life-saving technologies. The Parliament will also vote tomorrow on the implementation of Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS), another important text for road safety.

in CLEPA, 16-04-2019


“Today’s vote is excellent news. The EU demonstrates a strong commitment towards improving safety on Europe’s roads. After essential technologies such as seatbelts and airbags, the GSR will represent the next big leap, with solutions that help avoiding accidents in the first place,” said Sigrid de Vries, Secretary General of CLEPA, the association of automotive suppliers. The Parliament supports all the safety technologies put forward by the European Commission in its legislative proposal. “We salute that the Parliament decided to move the final vote ahead of the elections, allowing for a swift implementation,” added de Vries.

Automotive suppliers are providing active and passive safety systems with technically and economically mature innovations for all vehicle categories. However, the current EU vehicle safety standards were last updated almost a decade ago. The agreement confirmed the inclusion into the revised Regulation of all proposed technologies, including tyre-pressure monitoring systems, intelligent speed assistance, accident data recorders, and direct vision standards for trucks, which will be progressively made mandatory for new vehicles over several years.

According to the impact assessment accompanying the proposed legislation, over 16 years, the revised GSR is expected to reduce the number of road casualties by 24,794, avoid 140,740 serious injuries, and provide an overall net benefit for society of €15.4 bn, considering lives saved and additional costs. The Regulation will accelerate the deployment of effective and cost-efficient safety measures, which are already available on the market, and will boost the competitiveness and global leadership of the European automotive industry in this sector. De Vries: “Most safety systems are developed and supplied in Europe. New safety requirements will therefore push forward European research and innovation, contributing to generate growth, jobs, and investment in the EU. They will also pave the way towards connected and automated driving, by increasing the market penetration of technologies that will be required for automated vehicles in the future.”

The next milestone for road safety: the C-ITS Directive

In addition, the European Parliament will decide tomorrow on another essential piece of legislation paving the way towards connected and automated driving, which could also have an important impact on road safety. MEPs are considering whether to reject a delegated act related to the Directive on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS). The delegated act allows for the immediate deployment of applications and systems based on the internationally recognised ITS-G5 standard, a mature technology tested in large fleets and infrastructure projects. Many of its applications are related to safety, and could significantly improve upon the GSR’s mandatory technologies. For example, emergency braking and intelligent speed assistance would greatly benefit from connectivity. Rejecting the delegated act may lead to an implementation delay of two to three years at minimum, according to the European Commission. “CLEPA encourages MEPS to vote against the resolution rejecting the delegated act and in favour of a pragmatic approach to technological progress,” said de Vries.

Next steps

The Council of the European Union is now expected to formally adopt the GSR soon. Member States already confirmed their support for the text at COREPER level on 29 March.

 

 

Electrification and connectivity reshape the business into a service over the entire lifetime of the vehicle

CLEPA 10th Aftermarket Conference

in CLEPA, 28-03-2019


  • New business models are gaining ground, transforming the traditionally very stable automotive aftermarket 
  • New automotive services require the fair, undistorted, unmonitored and competitive access to in-vehicle data

More than 300 participants gathered at the 10th edition of the CLEPA Aftermarket Conference, today in Brussels, to discuss the latest trends and opportunities for the automotive aftermarket at a crucial time for industry.

In her keynote speech, Sigrid de Vries, Secretary General of CLEPA, highlighted:

“Driven by electrification, digitalisation and connectivity, new business models are gaining ground, reshaping the traditionally very stable automotive aftermarket from a repair and maintenance business into a services business over the entire lifetime of the vehicle. This will fundamentally change the face of this key part of the automotive suppliers’ activities. The CLEPA Aftermarket Conference is the leading event in this field in Europe and the place to meet for automotive suppliers, policy makers and other stakeholders. The opportunity to exchange views and learn about the latest legislative and technological developments in the sector is more relevant than ever. ”

As expressed by multiple speakers from industry and market analysts, the connectivity of vehicles and the utilisation of vehicle-generated data will trigger new services and business. Driven by the mandatory eCall regulation, connectivity in new vehicles has now become standard. A fundamental prerequisite to participate in this new emerging mobility market is the fair, undistorted, unmonitored and competitive access to in-vehicle data, of course with the consumer’s consent.

Frank Schlehuber, CLEPA Senior consultant Market Affairs commented:

Both connectivity and the expected substantial increase of electrified vehicles will disrupt the traditional aftermarket value chain. The way in which connectivity or, more specifically, the communication from and to a vehicle is realised, has a major impact on the competitiveness of market participants and the speed of development and implementation of innovative mobility services.”

“Especially the strong growth of BEVs will lead to a stagnating or even declining market for traditional wear and tear parts in mature markets. In combination with the ongoing consolidation of the wholesale distribution and the initiatives of vehicle manufacturers to either invest in the independent aftermarket or to increase significantly their share in the services market, adds further cost pressure on suppliers.”

The European Commission presented on the latest regulatory developments. With the new type approval requirements published in 2018, EU legislators have strengthened the independent aftermarket by securing access to electronically processable vehicle equipment information as well as securing the on-board-diagnostics functionality. With the upcoming revision of the motor vehicle bloc exemption regulation (MVBER) beyond 2023 and the revision of the repair clause, the European Commission has opened discussions that will be crucial for the future of the independent aftermarket.

The Conference also debated how to find and keep the right talent to participate in this dynamic part of the automotive business. After an introduction by recruitment consultancy Korn Ferry on the dimensions of leadership, a lively panel followed suit with representatives from suppliers, distributors and participants from other industries.

In an exhibition, open to all participants of the CLEPA Aftermarket Conference, the companies Schaeffler, Continental and Caruso Dataplace, jointly demonstrated a fully digitalised process to allow fast and efficient repair and maintenance of vehicles in the independent aftermarket. The exhibition also included a display showcasing the future of repair workshops in a connected world, presenting how the share of vehicles’ telematic data through a digital marketplace enables optimised logistics & repair processes, as well as higher consumer satisfaction.

 

 

CLEPA | Outlook on 2019 – Watch this space

The year 2019 promises to be a challenging year for many European automotive suppliers. The global economy is slowing down, most pertinently in China and Europe. Global trade tensions are aggravating matters. And the new EU CO2 emission targets, which are causing dramatic shifts in the vehicle manufacturers’ new-car portfolios, are beginning to bite hard at many a supplier’s side too.

in CLEPA, by Sigrid de Vries, CLEPA Secretary General, 31-01-2019


Certainly: alternative powertrain solutions offer chances for new business as well – there is a lot of European technology in a Tesla. But the volumes aren’t yet there to match the drawback in other areas. A similar story can be told of the, in itself highly-promising and increasingly sought-after, new-mobility solutions for connected and automated driving. The march is definitely on, but investment precedes revenue as volumes are still developing.

This doesn’t mean sentiment is bad. Automotive suppliers are champions in adjusting to new product- and market opportunities. They are at the forefront of new technology and mobility developments, and dealing with cyclical economic developments as well as ‘uncertainty’ is ingrained in their DNA. Automotive suppliers always strive for new openings and opportiunities.

Yet, some of the forces currently at play, do cause concern. Take the global trade disputes and Brexit: here’s a marked disruption of the integrated value-chain that has helped the automotive supply industry be the innovators and technology leaders they are today. The effects are potentially long-lasting. Many of the relocation and investment decisions taken by customers and suppliers in recent time will be irreversible, no matter the actual outcomes on the global stage.

Or, take the new CO2 emissions reduction targets set for cars and vans. It’s not that the direction wasn’t clear, or the technology unavailable. Automotive suppliers have in fact been advocating ambitious reform. But the timing, volumes and preferences that shape a new market were unclear – and still are, to a large extent, in the absence of charging infrastructure and knowledge of how consumers will respond.

Now, however, the suppliers’ first and foremost customers (read: car manufacturers) are responding. And they do not merely ‘shift’ their production plans; it’s in many cases more like a rupture: sudden and vast. The ‘disruption’ that this signifies, might be applauded from a need-for-change perspective – leaving aside the admittedly rhetoric question if ‘electric’ truly is the only solution to decarbonising transport and mobility.

But the disruption this causes, is painful at economic and societal level, exactly because of the fact that a rupture in demand for one and the dramatic ramp-up of production of another solution is an enormous challenge to manage without any damage: a negative impact in terms of costs, job losses, skills shortages and investment write-offs that would be avoided by going the more harmonious path of a transformation, without necessarily giving up on ambition.

So what does this mean for 2019? Adjustments by and in the industry. Close coordination with customers and societal stakeholders. Competition for new markets, both in Europe and in other geographies. Beating the macro trends with targeted strategy; building on key competencies, innovative power and a deep understanding of the longer-term direction that mobility of people and goods will take.

In Brussels, it’s going to be a transition year moving from one Commission and Parliament to another. Industry still hopes to make as much progress as possible with pending files – General Safety regulation, Heavy-duty CO2 emissions, Multi-annual Financial Framework, to name just a few – before the European elections in May. At so-called working level, the shaping of policies for pollutant emissions reduction and access to data will surely continue. In Geneva, UN-ECE will progress its important work on highly-automated vehicles.

CLEPA, the association, celebrates its 60st anniversary in 2019, and will launch a ‘white book’ on the future of mobility to mark that feat. Sixty years of shaping our automotive landscape and now driving the transformation to new mobility. What bright future is in stock? What does the automotive supply community have on offer? Watch this space!

 

 

 

CLEPA Innovation Awards 2019: Call for applications now open

CLEPA Innovation Awards recognises the excellence of the automotive supplier’s industry in the fields of Environment, Safety, Cooperation and Connectivity & Automation
Innovative applications can enter the contest until 29th March 2019

in CLEPA, 30-01-2019


 

The 4th edition of the “Innovation Awards” will be an important milestone in the 60th anniversary of CLEPA, acknowledging the important contributions from the automotive supplier´s sector in making mobility sustainable, safe and smart.

Automotive suppliers play a key role in innovating and adapting the automotive industry to meet new global societal challenges and regulatory requirements. Only in 2018, European automotive suppliers have invested more than 22€ billion in R&D, contributing to new technologies and systems for an ever-higher performance in terms of safety, sustainability, connectivity and seamless mobility.
Innovation is key to support the competitiveness of the European industry, and automotive suppliers are committed to remain the global leader in the development of emerging technologies, services and mobility solutions.

CLEPA would like to recognise the excellence of the industry, awarding the innovative achievements on the fields of Environment, Safety, Cooperation and Connectivity & Automation. Deloitte, the management consultancy partners up with CLEPA again to stress the achievements of the sector.
CLEPA now invites automotive suppliers from the whole value chain, from large corporations, SMEs and also start-ups to submit their contributions to the 4 different categories.

The call for applications will be open until the end of March, and the applications received will be assessed, by an excellent jury of international experts on the different fields, that will evaluate the ambition, market relevance, impact and quality of the applications. The selected candidates will be exemplary for the solutions provided today by automotive suppliers for tomorrow’s mobility challenges.
The awarded innovations and companies will be revealed during the CLEPA Innovation Awards 2019 ceremony, that will take place in Brussels, on the evening of 13th June.

The deadline for applications is the 29th of March 2019.

 

https://clepa.eu/events/clepa-innovation-awards-2019/

 

Supported by:

 

Innovation is key to preserve Europe´s leadership in the mobility sector

CLEPA, together with the European Forum for Manufacturing, hosted a dinner debate at the European Parliament yesterday, focusing on the importance of innovation for preserving and boosting European leadership in the mobility sector.

in CLEPA, 06-12-2018


 

The dinner-debate “Driving innovation forward” hosted by Members of the Parliament John Procter and Andor Deli, was attended by several other MEPs, European Commission officials and industry representatives, among others. The two winners of the CLEPA 2018 Innovation Awards – Plastic Omnium in the category Environment and Bosch in the category for Safety — were among the speakers that highlighted the benefits of continuous investment in research and development.

 

Innovation is crucial in the mobility sector as it contributes to sustainable and efficient transport and supports European competitiveness. Over the last years, European automotive suppliers have invested more than €22 billion per annum in innovative technologies putting them at the forefront of developments.

 

Innovation is closing the gap to achieve society’s 2050 environmental and safety targets. Automotive suppliers support a holistic approach that rewards innovation and efficiency and brings synergies between technologies, policies, infrastructures and sectors. Safety innovations are an equally essential and rich avenue for development, contributing to support Europe´s industrial competitiveness.

 

CLEPA organises the yearly Innovation Awards competition, that recognises the accomplishments made by European automotive system and component manufacturers in the areas of Environment, Safety, Connectivity, Automation and Cooperation.

 

Sigrid de Vries, CLEPA Secretary General commented: “It is increasingly important to develop new technologies and systems for an ever-higher performance in terms of safety, sustainability, connectivity and seamless mobility. Companies largely carry these investments themselves, injecting substantial revenues back into their product development. However, support from funding programmes remains highly important to boost pre-competitive and collaborative research involving universities, research organisations, industry, SMEs, and other actors research. Here, Europe can continue to play an important role in support of global leadership.”

 

On his opening speech, MEP John Procter highlighted “There is clear need for supporting R&D In Europe. The development of research, supply, processing and production strategies into light-weight component construction developments is crucial for advancement in a low-carbon transition in the automotive sector”. Also, MEP Andor Deli commented “technology neutrality must prevail, based on a ?well-to-wheel? approach on vehicle emissions. There is a request to the European Commission to propose a methodology for this by the end of 2022” also, he subscribed the importance of having an innovation strategy on the CEE countries that “aims to attract the research and development teams of the automotive OEMs for not just traditional but also autonomous driving”

 

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More information about CLEPA Innovation Awards here

2018 Awarded innovations brochure 

Videos from the winners in our YouTube channel

 

The policy papers and pictures from the event will be available next week at the European Forum for Manufacturing website   http://www.euromanuforum.com/

 

 

Let’s put industry at the core of the EU’s future! – A joint call to the candidates for the 2019 European Elections

A AFIA é uma das entidades signatárias deste manifesto.

in CLEPA, 17-10-2018


INDUSTRY MATTERS FOR EUROPE AND ITS CITIZENS

European industry is everywhere in our daily life: from the houses we build, the furniture we buy, the clothes we wear, the food we eat, the healthcare we receive, the energy and means of transport we use to the objects and products ever-present in our lives.

 

With its skilled workforce and its global reputation for quality and sustainability, industry is vital for Europe and its prosperity. Today, 52 million people and their families throughout Europe benefit directly and indirectly from employment in industrial sectors. Our supply chains, made up of hundreds of thousands of innovative SMEs and larger suppliers, are thriving and exporting European industrial excellence all over the world.

 

INDUSTRY NEEDS YOU!

Following the 2008 financial crisis, millions of manufacturing jobs were lost in Europe, each time bringing dramatic human and social consequences. Even now, we are still far from the employment levels seen before the crisis and jobs are vulnerable to worrying international trends, including increasing protectionism.

 

The European Union now needs an ambitious industrial strategy to help compete with other global regions – such as China, India and the USA – that have already put industry at the very top of their political agenda.

 

Therefore we, industrial sectors from all branches, call on you – future Members of the European Parliament – to commit today to:

• Put industry at the top of the political agenda of the European Parliament during the next institutional cycle (2019-2024)

• Urge the next European Commission to shortlist industry as a top priority of its 5-year Work Programme and appoint a dedicated Vice-President for Industry

• Uphold the next European Commission to swiftly present an ambitious long-term EU industrial strategy which shall include clear indicators and governance

 

We, the Signatories of this Manifesto, count on your support to make sure that Europe remains a hub for a leading, smart, innovative and sustainable industry, that benefits all Europeans and future generations.

 

Europe can be proud of its industry. Together we must put it at the core of the EU’s future!

 

Download the PDF version of the document here.

 

 

Environment committee demands targets for decarbonisation of trucks beyond feasible levels

The environment committee of the European Parliament calls for stricter CO2 targets for heavy-duty vehicles than proposed by the European Commission, and minimum quotas for sales of zero- and low-emission vehicles replacing sales incentives. These are the key outcomes of the vote in the environment committee today.

in CLEPA, 18-10-2018


 

“Automotive suppliers fully support the objective of reducing emissions and deliver the many technologies to achieve this. However, the sector calls for realistically ambitious targets to best support the transformation that is unmistakably underway,” says Sigrid de Vries, Secretary General of CLEPA, the association of the automotive supplier industry. “It is important to defend the principle of technology neutrality. We need to deploy all technology options available to effectively and efficiently reduce emissions while managing the transformation of the industry and mobility decisively yet sensibly. Electrification is part of the solution, but it is not the only one. Specifically, for long-haul transport the efficient combustion engine and low carbon liquid fuel will remain a necessity.”

 

Even more than passenger vehicles, European trucks are already highly efficient. Trucks are tools for businesses, therefore fuel consumption is a major cost factor and efficiency a key criterion for purchase decisions. Setting the same relative reduction targets as for passenger vehicles goes beyond what is technically feasible.

 

Today’s vote stands in contrast to the earlier vote in the committee for transport, where a clear majority of members confirmed the targets proposed by the European Commission. The environment committee voted in favour of compromise amendments proposed by the rapporteur, which call for a reduction of emissions by 20% and at least 35% respectively by 2025 and 2030 as opposed to 15% and 30% proposed by the Commission.

 

CLEPA welcomes the decision by the committee to define low-emission vehicles within their respective sub-group. However, defining their number at 50% below the reference emissions essentially prevents any vehicle from being categorised as low-emission, apart from purely battery electric trucks. The committee also calls for a “malus,” a penalty for manufacturers which fail to achieve a benchmark of electric vehicles as a proportion of their overall sales. “These proposals run counter to the principle of technology neutrality,” says de Vries.

 

Furthermore, the committee calls on the Commission to develop a methodology for the life-cycle analysis of embedded emissions in fuel and energy production as well as the construction of the vehicle and parts. “Making the step further towards well-to-wheel or life-cycle analysis is important to level the playing field between combustion engines and electric vehicles. Automotive suppliers have long been arguing in favour of a well-to-wheel approach,” says de Vries.

 

The next step is the vote in the plenary, likely before the end of this year. Members of the European Parliament will now have the opportunity to propose amendments to complement the position of the environment committee. Member States’ governments are expected to finalise their position in the coming months as well. Once both institutions have adopted their respective positions, tripartite negotiations will resume with the aim of amending and adopting the legislation.