Innovation is key to preserve Europe´s leadership in the mobility sector

CLEPA, together with the European Forum for Manufacturing, hosted a dinner debate at the European Parliament yesterday, focusing on the importance of innovation for preserving and boosting European leadership in the mobility sector.

in CLEPA, 06-12-2018


 

The dinner-debate “Driving innovation forward” hosted by Members of the Parliament John Procter and Andor Deli, was attended by several other MEPs, European Commission officials and industry representatives, among others. The two winners of the CLEPA 2018 Innovation Awards – Plastic Omnium in the category Environment and Bosch in the category for Safety — were among the speakers that highlighted the benefits of continuous investment in research and development.

 

Innovation is crucial in the mobility sector as it contributes to sustainable and efficient transport and supports European competitiveness. Over the last years, European automotive suppliers have invested more than €22 billion per annum in innovative technologies putting them at the forefront of developments.

 

Innovation is closing the gap to achieve society’s 2050 environmental and safety targets. Automotive suppliers support a holistic approach that rewards innovation and efficiency and brings synergies between technologies, policies, infrastructures and sectors. Safety innovations are an equally essential and rich avenue for development, contributing to support Europe´s industrial competitiveness.

 

CLEPA organises the yearly Innovation Awards competition, that recognises the accomplishments made by European automotive system and component manufacturers in the areas of Environment, Safety, Connectivity, Automation and Cooperation.

 

Sigrid de Vries, CLEPA Secretary General commented: “It is increasingly important to develop new technologies and systems for an ever-higher performance in terms of safety, sustainability, connectivity and seamless mobility. Companies largely carry these investments themselves, injecting substantial revenues back into their product development. However, support from funding programmes remains highly important to boost pre-competitive and collaborative research involving universities, research organisations, industry, SMEs, and other actors research. Here, Europe can continue to play an important role in support of global leadership.”

 

On his opening speech, MEP John Procter highlighted “There is clear need for supporting R&D In Europe. The development of research, supply, processing and production strategies into light-weight component construction developments is crucial for advancement in a low-carbon transition in the automotive sector”. Also, MEP Andor Deli commented “technology neutrality must prevail, based on a ?well-to-wheel? approach on vehicle emissions. There is a request to the European Commission to propose a methodology for this by the end of 2022” also, he subscribed the importance of having an innovation strategy on the CEE countries that “aims to attract the research and development teams of the automotive OEMs for not just traditional but also autonomous driving”

 

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More information about CLEPA Innovation Awards here

2018 Awarded innovations brochure 

Videos from the winners in our YouTube channel

 

The policy papers and pictures from the event will be available next week at the European Forum for Manufacturing website   http://www.euromanuforum.com/

 

 

Let’s put industry at the core of the EU’s future! – A joint call to the candidates for the 2019 European Elections

A AFIA é uma das entidades signatárias deste manifesto.

in CLEPA, 17-10-2018


INDUSTRY MATTERS FOR EUROPE AND ITS CITIZENS

European industry is everywhere in our daily life: from the houses we build, the furniture we buy, the clothes we wear, the food we eat, the healthcare we receive, the energy and means of transport we use to the objects and products ever-present in our lives.

 

With its skilled workforce and its global reputation for quality and sustainability, industry is vital for Europe and its prosperity. Today, 52 million people and their families throughout Europe benefit directly and indirectly from employment in industrial sectors. Our supply chains, made up of hundreds of thousands of innovative SMEs and larger suppliers, are thriving and exporting European industrial excellence all over the world.

 

INDUSTRY NEEDS YOU!

Following the 2008 financial crisis, millions of manufacturing jobs were lost in Europe, each time bringing dramatic human and social consequences. Even now, we are still far from the employment levels seen before the crisis and jobs are vulnerable to worrying international trends, including increasing protectionism.

 

The European Union now needs an ambitious industrial strategy to help compete with other global regions – such as China, India and the USA – that have already put industry at the very top of their political agenda.

 

Therefore we, industrial sectors from all branches, call on you – future Members of the European Parliament – to commit today to:

• Put industry at the top of the political agenda of the European Parliament during the next institutional cycle (2019-2024)

• Urge the next European Commission to shortlist industry as a top priority of its 5-year Work Programme and appoint a dedicated Vice-President for Industry

• Uphold the next European Commission to swiftly present an ambitious long-term EU industrial strategy which shall include clear indicators and governance

 

We, the Signatories of this Manifesto, count on your support to make sure that Europe remains a hub for a leading, smart, innovative and sustainable industry, that benefits all Europeans and future generations.

 

Europe can be proud of its industry. Together we must put it at the core of the EU’s future!

 

Download the PDF version of the document here.

 

 

Environment committee demands targets for decarbonisation of trucks beyond feasible levels

The environment committee of the European Parliament calls for stricter CO2 targets for heavy-duty vehicles than proposed by the European Commission, and minimum quotas for sales of zero- and low-emission vehicles replacing sales incentives. These are the key outcomes of the vote in the environment committee today.

in CLEPA, 18-10-2018


 

“Automotive suppliers fully support the objective of reducing emissions and deliver the many technologies to achieve this. However, the sector calls for realistically ambitious targets to best support the transformation that is unmistakably underway,” says Sigrid de Vries, Secretary General of CLEPA, the association of the automotive supplier industry. “It is important to defend the principle of technology neutrality. We need to deploy all technology options available to effectively and efficiently reduce emissions while managing the transformation of the industry and mobility decisively yet sensibly. Electrification is part of the solution, but it is not the only one. Specifically, for long-haul transport the efficient combustion engine and low carbon liquid fuel will remain a necessity.”

 

Even more than passenger vehicles, European trucks are already highly efficient. Trucks are tools for businesses, therefore fuel consumption is a major cost factor and efficiency a key criterion for purchase decisions. Setting the same relative reduction targets as for passenger vehicles goes beyond what is technically feasible.

 

Today’s vote stands in contrast to the earlier vote in the committee for transport, where a clear majority of members confirmed the targets proposed by the European Commission. The environment committee voted in favour of compromise amendments proposed by the rapporteur, which call for a reduction of emissions by 20% and at least 35% respectively by 2025 and 2030 as opposed to 15% and 30% proposed by the Commission.

 

CLEPA welcomes the decision by the committee to define low-emission vehicles within their respective sub-group. However, defining their number at 50% below the reference emissions essentially prevents any vehicle from being categorised as low-emission, apart from purely battery electric trucks. The committee also calls for a “malus,” a penalty for manufacturers which fail to achieve a benchmark of electric vehicles as a proportion of their overall sales. “These proposals run counter to the principle of technology neutrality,” says de Vries.

 

Furthermore, the committee calls on the Commission to develop a methodology for the life-cycle analysis of embedded emissions in fuel and energy production as well as the construction of the vehicle and parts. “Making the step further towards well-to-wheel or life-cycle analysis is important to level the playing field between combustion engines and electric vehicles. Automotive suppliers have long been arguing in favour of a well-to-wheel approach,” says de Vries.

 

The next step is the vote in the plenary, likely before the end of this year. Members of the European Parliament will now have the opportunity to propose amendments to complement the position of the environment committee. Member States’ governments are expected to finalise their position in the coming months as well. Once both institutions have adopted their respective positions, tripartite negotiations will resume with the aim of amending and adopting the legislation.

 

 

 

Brexit: Auto industry urges negotiators to avert worst-case scenario

Ahead of this evening’s Brexit summit, Europe’s auto manufacturers and suppliers have come together to issue a stark warning on the potentially far-reaching impacts of a no-deal scenario on their sector, which would threaten their very business model.

in CLEPA, 17-10-2018


 

Automobile production plants – be they in the EU27 or the UK – receive and fit millions of parts into vehicles every day. All manufacturers rely on ‘just-in-time’ and ‘just-in-sequence’ delivery and production, without any delays or obstacles. These parts are in constant transit in trucks, arriving as and when they are needed.

 

Every day 1,100 EU trucks cross the Channel to deliver to car and engine plants in the United Kingdom alone, for example. After Brexit, even short hold-ups at customs will cause massive logistical problems, disrupting the production process and generating significant costs.

 

“Our members are already making contingency plans and are looking for warehouse spaces to stockpile parts,” stated Erik Jonnaert, Secretary General of the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA), which represents the 15 major Europe-based car, van, truck and bus manufacturers. “However, the space required to stockpile for more than a short time would be absolutely huge – and expensive.”

 

“Some of our members are also planning a temporary post-Brexit production shutdown. But the harsh fact is that no amount of contingency planning can realistically cover all the gaps left by the UK’s withdrawal from the EU on WTO terms.”

 

Under WTO rules, a 10% tariff would be applied to all cars traded between the EU and the UK. Jonnaert: “We cannot forget that profit margins in our industry are significantly lower than 10%. At the end of the day, these extra costs will either be passed on to the consumer or will have to be absorbed by the manufacturers.”

 

“The clock is ticking, but it is not yet too late. That is why we are urging the UK and EU negotiating teams on both sides to redouble their efforts to successfully conclude a withdrawal deal,” Jonnaert underlined.

 

Sigrid de Vries, Secretary General, European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA): “Everything possible must be done to secure a future exchange of goods, services and people that is frictionless. Automotive components often cross borders several times before the final product reaches the customer, and that includes Channel crossings. Any change in the level of integration of the value chain will have an adverse effect on the competitiveness of individual companies and the sector as a whole.”

 

“Smaller companies in particular, that constitute important building blocks of the supply chain, do not have the internal systems, IT platforms or staff in place to deal with customs declarations, tariff classification, customs valuation, or calculations based on content origin. SMEs will be forced to deal with at least some of these issues if they want to continue to trade and serve their customers, facing additional financial and logistical risks.”

 

De Vries: “CLEPA recently surveyed its membership and the most important feedback to policy makers was: remove uncertainty. It remains crucially important to provide clarity on the future relation with the UK as quickly as possible, starting with a withdrawal agreement so that a cliff-edge scenario can be avoided.”

 

 

 

CO2 targets – Automotive suppliers urge co-legislators to take into account the risk for employment

Member States in the Council have adopted their position (‘general approach’) on the regulation for CO2 targets for cars and vans. Environment ministers decided to raise the target for cars for 2030 by 5 percentage points to 35%, raise the threshold of the mechanism to incentivise zero and low emission vehicles by 5 percentage points to 35% whilst better weighting low emission vehicles in the mechanism.

in CLEPA, 10-10-2018


 

“Both the European Parliament and the governments in the Council have now opted to increase the level of ambition. Automotive suppliers see the targets that have been proposed by the European Commission as challenging yet balanced. Going strongly beyond the Commission proposal carries risks to the industrial footprint of the automotive suppliers industry in Europe, putting high-value jobs in the balance”, says Sigrid de Vries, Secretary General of the association of the automotive suppliers industry (CLEPA). “Automotive suppliers advocate an ambitious transformation rather than negative disruption.”

 

“It will be crucial to not set the targets too high and provide the right boundary conditions through a positive incentive mechanism for low and zero emission vehicles. Specifically, a ‘malus’ as requested by the Parliament will have a negative effect. Better weighting of low emission vehicles, such as plug-in hybrids, is positive”, says de Vries.

 

“Only a technology neutral regulation will ensure that emissions will be reduced efficiently. However, there is strong pressure towards favouring battery-electric vehicles at the expense of other solutions, such as hybridisation and alternative fuels, which have a major potential to contribute to decarbonisation. Furthermore, it will be important to confirm that the step forward to well-to-wheel or life-cycle analysis will be done in future legislation.”

 

“Automotive suppliers fully support the goal of decarbonising mobility and produce a wealth of technologies to achieve this. It is a declared aim to remain globally competitive with a large variety of smart, safe and green mobility-related technologies, supporting the jobs of five million people in Europe today. Competitive regulation supporting both the environment as well as employment is a key to Europe’s success.”

 

Tripartite negotiations between Council, European Parliament and Commission are scheduled to begin today.

 

 

Automotive suppliers urge co-legislators to stay with CO2 targets proposed by European Commission

Today, the Plenary of the European Parliament has taken the position for a reduction of 40% of carbon emissions from new passenger cars and vans by 2030, well beyond the European Commission proposal, as well as rules to mandate the sales of electric vehicles. These are the key outcomes of a vote in Strasbourg today.

in CLEPA, 03-10-2018


 

“The European Commission proposal of a 30% reduction is a challenging yet realistic target, based on a thorough evaluation of the various elements at stake, environmental priorities prevailing”, comments Roberto Vavassori, President of CLEPA, the association of the automotive suppliers’ industry. “We call on the co-legislators not to go beyond the original proposal. Any target above 30% is exposing our industry to a concrete risk of disruption.”

 

Member States are expected to take a decision on their position on October 9 at the Environment Council. Once both institutions have adopted their respective positions, tripartite negotiations will resume with the aim of agreeing and adopting the legislation.

 

“Automotive suppliers fully support the goal of decarbonising mobility and produce a wealth of technologies to achieve this. Technology neutrality is an important compass which regulators should not abandon, as it enables the deployment of the broadest spectrum of solutions. Today´s vote, however, favours Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs) at the expense of other solutions, such as hybridisation and alternative fuels, which have a major potential to contribute to decarbonisation as well,” adds Vavassori.

 

“It is our declared aim to remain globally competitive with a large variety of smart, safe and green mobility-related technologies, supporting the jobs of five million people in Europe today. Competitive regulation supporting both the environment as well as employment is a key to Europe’s success”, says Vavassori.

 

“It is crucial too that the boundary conditions for the regulation will be improved in the weeks to come”, says Sigrid de Vries, CLEPA Secretary General. “Today, MEPs not only voted for a stricter regime for ‘eco-innovations’, technology solutions which reduce emissions without being recognised by the test cycle. They also supported a ‘malus’, a penalty for vehicle manufacturers which fail to achieve a benchmark of mostly battery electric vehicles as a proportion of their overall sales. This amounts to a de facto prescription of technology. It is disappointing that proposals for a better recognition in the benchmark of hybrid technology have been rejected.”

 

The Parliament also calls on the Commission to develop a methodology for the life-cycle analysis of embedded emissions in fuel and energy production as well as in the manufacture of vehicles and parts. “This is important to level the playing field for combustion engines, electric vehicles and the many variants in between. Making the step towards well-to-wheel or life-cycle analysis is a welcome approach for future legislation”, says De Vries.

 

Members of the European Parliament approved the report 389 in favour, 239 against and 41 abstentions and adopted the mandate for the rapporteur to begin tripartite negotiations with the Council and the Commission.

 

 

 

CLEPA warns of the effects of a no deal Brexit to the automotive suppliers´ industry

The informal summit in Salzburg will see a special meeting of EU-27 leaders, without UK Prime Minister Theresa May, to discuss Brexit. No formal conclusions are prepared, however it is expected, that this meeting will set the stage for further Council meetings focussed on Brexit and the possible conclusion of a withdrawal agreement to kick off the transition period following March 2019.

in CLEPA, 18-09-2018


 

“The automotive industry is operating highly integrated supply chains. Parts, components and vehicles cross borders many times before reaching the consumer. Frictionless trade as well as regulatory certainty is important. Brexit impacts both and it is important to make progress on these aspects soon”, says Sigrid De Vries, Secretary General of CLEPA, the European association of the automotive suppliers.

“It would be very positive, if the informal summit would unlock progress on the way towards an agreement between the EU and the UK on the future relationship, including a transition period and avoiding a ‘no-deal’ Brexit. A no-deal Brexit would be seriously damaging to the supplier’s industry in Europe and the UK. The current uncertainty about the way forward is amongst the key concerns for automotive parts and component manufacturers, as shown in a recent survey of the CLEPA membership.”

 

Automotive suppliers’ priorities for a future trade relationship cover tariff free exchange of goods, minimal customs procedures and access to trade preferences as provided for by the Customs Union. Furthermore, regulatory alignment and cooperation in the future are essential to avoid non-tariff barriers to trade.

 

“Validity of type approvals issued by the UK in the past are a particular concern and currently debated in the Council and the European Parliament,” says De Vries. CLEPA advocates that parts, components, systems and equipment bearing a valid UK type-approval certification at the date of Brexit need to maintain their access to the EU-27 market, therefore they need to be considered valid for placement on the market at any future time. In addition, sufficient time must be allowed to permit the application of the solutions provided with this new regulation, therefore this transition period shall cover at least the whole of 2020, with the option to transfer UK type-approvals also after their expiration. Vice versa, under the withdrawal agreement CLEPA calls for a safeguard that shall also be granted to goods bearing a valid EU-27 approval for continued placement on the UK market. “It is important that these points be taken into account by both the Council and the European Parliament when amending the proposed legislation.”

 

 

Note to the editor:

CLEPA, the European Association of Automotive Suppliers, represents over 3.000 companies supplying state-of-the-art components and innovative technology for safe, smart and sustainable mobility, investing over 20 billion euros yearly in research and development. Automotive suppliers in Europe employ nearly five million people across the continent.

 

 

Facts about the European automotive industry:

  • Some 12 million people are employed in the European automotive industry
  • European automotive suppliers directly employ 5 million people
  • European automotive suppliers invest more than €20bn in RDI per year. They are the biggest private investor into research and innovation
  • Per year, 18 million vehicles are manufactured in Europe, contributing to the stability and growth of the European economy

 

 

Environment committee underestimates progress in decarbonisation of transport

The environment committee of the European Parliament calls for stricter CO2 targets for passenger cars and vans than proposed by the European Commission and a threshold in addition to incentives for sales of low and zero emission vehicles. These are key outcomes of a vote in the committee last night.

in CLEPA, 11-09-2018


“Automotive suppliers fully support the objective of reducing emissions and are proud to deliver the technology to achieve it. However, the sector calls for realistically ambitious targets to best support the transformation that is unmistakably underway”, says Sigrid de Vries, Secretary General of CLEPA, the association of the automotive supplier’s industry.

Yesterday’s vote stands in contrast to earlier votes in the committees for transport and industry, where majorities of members confirmed targets as proposed by the European Commission. “The position of the environment committee therefore does not reflect the entire spectrum of opinions in the European Parliament. We hope that the members of the Parliament will come to a more balanced position in the plenary session in October”, says De Vries.

“A key requirement is to reduce emissions in the most efficient, technology-open as well as least disruptive way when it comes to jobs and structural change”, she adds. “Electrification is a major part of the solution. Industry assesses that the 30% reduction target proposed by the Commission will trigger a share of electric and electrified vehicles including mild hybrids, plug-in hybrids, fuel cell and battery-electric solutions of at least 60%, and very possibly much higher than that as technologies will increasingly be combined to meet emission targets as well as serve a broad variety of transport needs in a tailored way. Today, this percentage remains in the low single digit range. Major investments are therefore being made and will continue at a fast pace.”

The environment committee voted in favour of compromise amendments proposed by the rapporteur, which call for a reduction of emissions by 20% and 45% respectively by 2025 and 2030 as opposed to 15% and 30% proposed by the Commission. The committee also calls for a “malus”, a penalty for manufacturers which fail to achieve a benchmark of electric vehicles as a proportion of their overall sales. “This is counter the principle of technology neutrality”, says De Vries.

Furthermore, the committee calls on the Commission to develop a methodology for the life-cycle analysis of embedded emissions in fuel and energy production as well as the construction of the vehicle and parts. “Making the step further towards well-to-wheel or life-cycle analysis is important to level the playing field between combustion engines and electric vehicles. Automotive suppliers have long been arguing in favour of a well-to-wheel approach”, says De Vries.

The next step is the vote in the Plenary, likely at the beginning of October. Members of the European Parliament will now have the opportunity to propose amendments to complement the position of the environment committee. Member States’ governments are expected to finalise their position in October as well. Once both institutions have adopted their respective positions, tripartite negotiations will resume with the aim of amending and adopting the legislation.

 

 

 

 

CLEPA highlights transformative forces during Automechanika 2018 in Frankfurt

CLEPA participates in the 25th edition of Automechanika, presenting how connectivity and digitalisation are changing the automotive aftermarket, as reported in the “Aftermarket 2025” study.

in CLEPA, 10-09-2018


 

The automotive industry is being transformed by megatrends such as electrification, automated driving and connectivity. This is impacting the aftermarket business as well, that represents on average about 15-20% of the total business for automotive suppliers.

CLEPA commissioned the study “Aftermarket 2025” from the Danish agency QVARTZ and Stern Stewart & Co Munich, who conducted numerous expert interviews with decision makers from the automotive supplier’s industry, trade, OEM and insurance companies, to investigate the effects on individual market participants.

The automotive aftermarket has a global market volume of 400 billion EUR and is estimated to grow to EUR 566 billion by 2025, this corresponds to an annual growth of 4.5%. The study shows that the major growth will take place in Asia (+8.6%), catching up with USA and Europe. This growth will no longer take place in the classic segments, but in new developments, such as software, content, data or retrofit solutions which will be offered over the lifetime of a vehicle.

Taking into account the hypothesis that 70% of vehicles will be connected by 2025, this will open the opportunity to new services and business models. New digital players such as mobility service providers, repair platforms, insurance providers or eCommerce are gaining relevance.

The prerequisite for all these services is, user consent provided, the ability to communicate with the vehicle, make use of the data generated in the vehicle and the access to available resources in the vehicle. Sigrid de Vries, CLEPA Secretary General, highlighted the importance of a fair and equal access to in-vehicle data to utilise the full potential of new and innovative data-based business models. “There is a need to ensure a fair and non-discriminatory access for all market participants to facilitate undistorted competition between service providers in this emerging market of data-based mobility services”.

Also, future vehicle ownership models will change the aftermarket. Leasing, re-leasing and mobility services are gaining in popularity and will lead to more decisions on vehicle repair and maintenance being made by professional fleet operators. Both OEMS and independent providers will increase their share in the fleet business by using the opportunities and offering additional services.

The trend towards fleet business, slow market growth in wear and tear parts in combination with a fast consolidating wholesale distribution will lead to increased pressure on automotive parts manufacturers.

In the next years, CLEPA expects an intense discussion on the total costs in the supply chain and on more efficient flows of goods, which will ultimately redefine the go-to-market strategy of some suppliers, also with new providers of platforms in the field of eCommerce, repair management, repair brokerage or fleet management that will find new cooperation models.

“The aftermarket is evolving from a pure maintenance and repair market into a mobility-related service sector. Access to in-vehicle data and changes in vehicle ownership models are bringing both challenges and opportunities. We expect to see more changes in the aftermarket in the next five years than in the previous two decades”, highlighted Frank Schlehuber, CLEPA Senior Advisor Aftermarket, during the Automechanika press conference.

 

 

EU underestimates job losses through EV push, trade group says

The European Union is underestimating job losses linked to the transition to electric vehicles, the European automotive industry association ACEA said in a report, ahead of a key European Parliament vote on Monday over on future emissions standards.

in Automotive News Europe, by Peter Sigal, 06-09-2018


The ACEA said that a “forced push” to EVs to meet emissions standards would have a “profound” impact on EU employment, because the production and maintenance of electric drivetrains is much less labor-intensive than conventional drivetrains. Electric motors and drivetrains have fewer moving parts and less mechanical complexity than internal combustion engines.

The ACEA, which represents 15 major Europe-based vehicle manufacturers, says the industry would be hit hard if post-2021 emissions regulations lead to a rapid shift toward electrification. The EU is expected to call for a further CO2 emissions reduction of at least 30 percent by 2030. That target would be almost impossible to meet without a large increase in electric and hybrid vehicles.

Suppliers are expected to be hit especially hard, according to the report by FTI Consulting commissioned by the automakers group and released this week. The report, citing a study by UBS, said suppliers will produce 38 percent fewer parts and components, while automakers will produce 17 percent fewer components.

Another potential drag on employment is overseas production of batteries, which make up 35 percent to 50 percent of the cost of an electric vehicle, the report said. “Policy makers must face the fact that the EU will become extremely dependent on rare-earth materials and batteries produced outside of Europe,” the ACEA said.

“This report makes it clear that overly stringent CO2 targets, as well as unrealistic sales quota for battery electric vehicles (the so-called ‘benchmarks’), could lead to serious structural problems across the EU,” ACEA secretary general Erik Jonnaert said in a statement.

The European Commission’s Impact Assessment report on future emissions regulations published in November 2017 forecasts job losses and gains by sector, depending on different levels of adoption of low-emissions vehicles, which it defines as having tailpipe CO2 emissions of 25 g/km or less.

As many as 16,600 jobs could be lost by 2030 in the automotive sector, assuming an adoption rate of 13 percent to 30 percent, according to the EU. However, that would be partly offset by higher employment in the electricity sector, the EU said.

The report commissioned by the automakers’ group said that the EU did not adequately explain its employment forecasts, given the large differences in complexity between electric and internal combustion drivetrains.

It said that a switch to electric vehicles could result in a 60 percent reduction in employment in powertrain manufacturing, spare part manufacturing and maintenance. The report cited Daimler as saying that 80 percent to 90 percent fewer jobs are necessary to produce electric motors than internal-combustion engines.

Roberto Vavassori, the present of European supplier organization CLEPA, has raised similar concerns ahead of the coming votes. “It’s a challenging balance between the aims of the general public and what is doable by the industry,” Vavassori said in June at CLEPA’s annual innovation awards ceremony, noting that one-third of automotive sector employment was in powertrains. “We believe electrification is an important and essential part of the mobility of the future, but we need an orderly transition to it in Europe, otherwise we will lose our world-leading advantage in mobility.”

The automotive industry is already facing challenges meeting a fleet standard of 95 g/km, set to go into effect by the end of 2021.

Consumers are turning away from diesel engines, which generally emit lower levels of CO2 than gasoline engines, in the wake of the Volkswagen Group scandal. In addition, SUVs and crossovers, which tend to be heavier and less efficient than equivalent sedans or hatchbacks, are making up an ever-increasing percentage of sales.

The introduction this year of the WLTP bench tests and RDE road tests, which aim to better duplicate real world driving conditions, have found that some manufacturers are farther away from the 95 g/km limit than thought.